Asia, Central Asia and the Far East

History Today, November 2003 | Go to article overview

Asia, Central Asia and the Far East


Mark Ravina's The Last Samurai: The Life and Battles of Saigo Takamori (John Wiley and Sons, 16.50 [pounds sterling]) offers an intriguing insight into samurai culture and feudalism in Japan, as manifested in the Meiji age of the late nineteenth century.

John Peacock explores the magic of Tibet in The Tlbetan Way of Life, Death and Rebirth (Duncan Baird Publishing, 14.99 [pounds sterling]).

The politics, economics and culture of Eurasia are examined in First Globalization: The Eurasian Exchange, 1500-1800 (Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 61 [pounds sterling]; 22.95 [pounds sterling]) by Geoffrey C. Gunn.

Curative Powers: Medicine and Empire In Stalin's Central Asia (University of Pittsburgh Press, $34.95) by Paula Michaels shows how the Soviet government's bid to bring biomedicine to Kazakhstan masked darker plans to infiltrate and destroy Kazakh culture.

Sumantra Bose suggests methods for conflict resolution in South Asia in Kashmir: Roots of Conflict, Paths to Peace (Harvard University Press. 16.95 [pounds sterling]).

Judith M. Brown examines the life and times of one of India's great democratic rulers and founder of the modern nation, in her Nehru: A Political Life (Yale University Press, 25 [pounds sterling]).

Rayne Kruger provides a fascinating account of one the world's oldest civilisations in All Under Heaven: A Complete History of China (John Wiley, 16. …

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