I Had to Get Girls out of the House; I Thought about Phoning Police but Kept Thinking: How Do You Explain This?

The Evening Standard (London, England), December 1, 2003 | Go to article overview

I Had to Get Girls out of the House; I Thought about Phoning Police but Kept Thinking: How Do You Explain This?


Byline: PAUL CHESTON;PATRICK MCGOWAN

IAN HUNTLEY described to the court his actions after the girls died.

Huntley: "I remember thinking about what to do. I was thinking of calling the police.

"But I couldn't believe what had happened and I kept thinking, how do I explain this to the police?

"If you can't believe what has happened yourself, how can you expect the police to believe it?"

His first memory after checking both girls for signs of life was of sitting in the corner of the landing looking at Jessica's body. He didn't know how long he had been there but he had been sick.

Huntley: "Holly had gone a strange colour. I felt Jessica for signs of life but there were none.

"To be honest, I wasn't quite sure what to do."

Asked what he did next, Huntley said: "I decided against calling the police.

I knew I had to get the girls out of the house."

Stephen Coward, QC, defending, asked: "Did you have a plan in mind?"

Huntley: "The only thing I knew was that I had to get them into my car, out of the house."

Coward: "If you had the time over again, Mr Huntley, what would you have done?"

Huntley: "I wouldn't even be in this situation now if I could have that time again because I would have pulled Holly out of the bath."

Mr Coward then asked what happened after Huntley realised that he was on the landing with Holly and Jessica motionless in the bathroom.

Huntley: "I decided against calling the police."

Coward: "So what did you do?"

Huntley: "I knew that I had to get the girls out of the house."

Mr Coward asked Huntley if he had "a plan" for what he was going to do with the girls at that time.

Huntley: "The only thing I knew was that I had to get them into my car and get them out of the house.

That was all I knew at that time."

He said the whole episode of getting the two bodies into his car took "a few minutes".

Huntley said it was still light when he put them into the car.

Coward: "What part of the car did you put them in?"

Huntley: "The boot."

Asked what steps he had taken to make sure he was not seen carrying the girls out to his car, Huntley said he had moved Holly round the corner of the stairs so she could not be seen from the door.

Huntley: "I opened the door and looked outside and I couldn't see anybody. I opened the boot of my car again as I went back in."

He said the boot of his car was nearer the door.

Asked by Mr Coward whether the girls were in the same clothes that they had been wearing, he replied that they were.

Coward: "Was there anything else on either of their clothes as you took them out?"

Huntley: "No."

Coward: "Having put them in the boot, did you close the boot lid?"

Huntley: "Yes."

Coward: "Did you lock the car?"

Huntley: "Yes."

Mr Coward then asked Huntley to try to outline the thoughts going through his head between the moment he decided on his course of action and the moment he locked the car with the girls in the boot.

Coward : "What's going on in your head?"

Huntley: "I don't think anything was."

Coward : "By the time you locked the car, had you worked out a plan of what you were going to do next?"

Huntley: "No, I didn't know where I was going to take them."

Coward : "Are you able to help in terms of minutes or hours, or light or dark, what time it was you set off from the college with the girls in the boot?

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