Britain's Cutting Edge, by Jag Boss; GERMANY IS SUFFERING THE DISEASE OF TOO-HIGH SOCIAL COSTS'

Daily Mail (London), March 7, 1997 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Britain's Cutting Edge, by Jag Boss; GERMANY IS SUFFERING THE DISEASE OF TOO-HIGH SOCIAL COSTS'


Byline: RAY MASSEY

THE boss of Jaguar's German operation gave Britain an amazing vote of confidence yesterday.

Hartmut Kieven said punitive social costs placed on his country's employers by the EU's Social Chapter were too heavy a burden, giving British companies the competitive edge in Europe.

`Britain has done a tremendous job in the last few years,' he told me as he left the Geneva Motor Show for a sales drive in Frankfurt. `It is better off than Germany. It is doing fantastically well.

`You have the lowest unemployment, lowest inflation and lowest taxes for top management and entrepreneurs. Don't change now.

`Look at the social cost burden I have employing people. I pay the employee 100 per cent and then have to pay 50 per cent on top.

`We used to talk about the British disease of strikes and low productivity. Now we have the German disease of far too high social costs.'

He said the EU must learn its lesson from Britain and take a more realistic view of the level of compulsory social cost contributions continental firms are forced to make for employees under the Social Chapter, which Britain opted out of at Maastricht.

His message comes as Germany faces its worst unemployment - 4.3million - since the depression of the 1930s and struggles to meet the criteria for joining a single currency.

Sales of Jaguar's XK8 sports car are booming in Germany, running at double the predicted level - the firm says buyers are trading in Mercedes, BMWs and Porsches to buy British.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Britain's Cutting Edge, by Jag Boss; GERMANY IS SUFFERING THE DISEASE OF TOO-HIGH SOCIAL COSTS'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?