The Baby Farmer; This Doctor Says Mother Who Had Three Children Adopted Deserves Help Starting a New Family

Daily Mail (London), August 19, 1996 | Go to article overview

The Baby Farmer; This Doctor Says Mother Who Had Three Children Adopted Deserves Help Starting a New Family


Byline: OLIVER HARVEY

A FERTILITY specialist is campaigning to have a woman patient, whose three children were adopted after being taken into care, accepted for IVF treatment.

John Parsons insists that the 30-year-old unemployed woman, who has also had two abortions, deserves another chance to start a family.

His backing will fuel the debate about the availability of fertility treatment, highlighted by the case of Mandy Allwood, who is expecting eight babies.

Mr Parsons, chief consultant in fertility at King's College Hospital in London, likened his patient's desire for a sixth attempt at motherhood to a criminal turning over a new leaf.

`Not allowing her on the IVF programme is like society refusing to rehabilitate a criminal,' he said last night.

The woman, whose partner of ten years is also unemployed, has already been rejected twice by the hospital's ethics committee.

Mr Parsons said his patient, who had five teenage pregnancies, hoped to be treated on the NHS. Her fertility was affected after she contracted a sexually-transmitted disease.

Mr Parsons said the woman's three children had been taken into care and later adopted because her husband and father had been accused of being involved in child sexual abuse.

`Having spoken to her, I know she deserves another chance. People change and they learn by their mistakes,' he said from his home in West London.

`This poor woman was thrust into a family situation in her late teens.

She had a drunken husband who never gave her any money, and no parenting skills because her parents were incapable of giving them to her.

`This woman will probably end up in a psychiatric hospital if she does not get on the programme.'

He refused to give any more details about the woman, adding: `She is not a very strong person, so I don't want to drag her into any of this.'

Mr Parsons said he believed patients should be accepted for fertility treatment on a first-come, first-served basis.

`I am in favour of treating people in the chronological order in which they are referred to me,' he added.

`When you start weighing people up, it gets very difficult.

`This woman came to us some time ago and I have asked the ethical committee to allow her on to a programme twice, although I don't have to accept their decisions,' he added.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Baby Farmer; This Doctor Says Mother Who Had Three Children Adopted Deserves Help Starting a New Family
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.