Smoking Is a Greater Cancer Risk to Women; TWO SURVEYS TO CAUSE ALARM

Daily Mail (London), August 16, 1996 | Go to article overview

Smoking Is a Greater Cancer Risk to Women; TWO SURVEYS TO CAUSE ALARM


Byline: RICHARD SHEARS

WOMEN smokers are at greater risk than men of developing lung cancer - and need fewer cigarettes to bring on the disease, say researchers.

To add to their problem, women find it more difficult to give up the habit.

One study found that a woman who smoked the equivalent of a packet a day for 40 years had a cancer risk three times higher than a man smoking the same amount.

Steve Gourlay, who carried out worldwide research on behalf of the Australasian College of Physicians in conjunction with the National Heart Foundation, found that women in the western world were less likely to give up.

`There are other studies which found higher levels of cellular damage in the genes of female smokers,' he went on.

`This suggests that the same amount of smoking caused more harm to women than men, rather than that women simply had different smoking habits.'

Mr Gourlay's research also revealed that in Australia only 18 per cent of women who smoked more than 15 cigarettes a day gave up smoking, compared with 25 per cent of men.

Doctors have expressed concern in recent months about the number of teenage girls who have taken up smoking, although no studies have been conducted to find out the rate of increase.

DRINK AND DRUGS, A WAY OF LIFE AT 15

FOUR in ten youngsters have taken drugs by the time they are 16 and almost all have tried alcohol.

More than one teenager in ten is a regular user of cannabis, the most popular illegal drug, a survey has revealed.

`A very high proportion of teenagers have absorbed drug use into their interests along with music and fashion,' said Professor Martin Plant, director of Edinburgh University's Alcohol and Health Research Group.

`There is no sign that the steady rise in illicit drug use among teenagers since the Sixties is in any way being checked or slowing down. If anything, it has gained momentum.'

Drug use is highest in Scotland where almost 60 per cent of boys and half the girls have taken cannabis, compared with England's 42 per cent for boys and 38 per cent for girls. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Smoking Is a Greater Cancer Risk to Women; TWO SURVEYS TO CAUSE ALARM
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.