Why No Council in Britain Dare Give This Man a Job; If You Thought That Political Correctness Was Dead, Think Again

Daily Mail (London), August 28, 1997 | Go to article overview

Why No Council in Britain Dare Give This Man a Job; If You Thought That Political Correctness Was Dead, Think Again


Byline: LEO MCKINSTRY

THE CONTINUING grip of the warped ideology of political correctness on our public institutions was once again highlighted by yesterday's interview in the Daily Mail with Bill Biginton.

Biginton, a man of impeccable antiracist credentials and married to an Asian, was forced out of his job at Leftwing Lewisham Council in South London in order to make way for a black female colleague. He subsequently won his case for racial discrimination at an industrial tribunal but is now on the dole and finding it virtually impossible to get another job.

Some may have thought that the extremes of political correctness had disappeared from our public life, confined to the same dustbin of history as Derek Hatton, Ted Knight, the GLC and the other phenomena of mid-Eighties Loony Leftism.

Nothing could be further from the truth. Far from being extinct, this creed has become the new orthodoxy of our age for all too many of our public servants.

The characteristics of this outlook an obsession with alleged 'prejudice', a narrow focus on the victim-status of oppressed groups, and a quer- ulous suspicion of all the values and traditions of our British Christian heritage - can be found throughout the institutional fabric of our country, from the wretched new Governmental Women's Unit to the ethno-graffiti on British Airways tailplanes.

Nowhere is this ideology more powerful than in Labour-dominated local government, where the fixation with perceived racism, sexism or homophobia continues to distort priorities.

Take Birmingham City Council. Though it has massive debts and is making cuts of more than [pounds sterling]30 million this year, the council is still spending [pounds sterling]1.4 million a year on its Equalities Division, which includes a staff of 31 and is led by a Head of Equalities on [pounds sterling]53,000 a year.

Last month, Birmingham decided to spend another [pounds sterling]60,000 on events to mark the 50th anniversary of the independence of India and Pakistan.

Justifying the decision, council leader Theresa Stewart said: 'We are celebrating the end of the British empire,' words that are all too indicative of the anti-patriotic spirit of the politically correct ideologues.

Earlier in the year, the council forked out [pounds sterling]17,500 to fly teenagers from all over Europe to a youth conference in Birmingham to discuss the legalisation of drugs.

Another graphic example of the grotesque municipal priorities comes from Preston.

There, the Labour-run council has recently decided to spend [pounds sterling]7,000 on a research project into the 'needs of lesbians and Grotesque gays' in the town. Yet, only last week, the council refused a request for a grant of [pounds sterling]1,500 towards an event in Lancashire for couples celebrating their golden wedding anniversaries.

The celebration is aimed at those who did not get a place at the Queen's own anniversary garden party at Buckingham Palace.

Given the politically correct mindset of the Labour group, it comes as no surprise to find the council leader describing the wedding party as 'a daft idea'.

These attitudes prevail in local authorities throughout Britain. Staff at the Equality Section of Glasgow City Council, for instance, have produced a leaflet on the use of 'non-sexist language'.

This ludicrous waste of paper include instructions against using terms such as 'storeman' which, according to the Glasgow bureaucrats 'can restrict entry and encourage discrimination'.

The municipal leaflet also explains that 'requiring women to reveal their marital status . . . is sexist and discriminatory'.

Also in Scotland, the Director of Education for Aberdeen has this week proposed a ban on pets in school for young pupils.

Apparently, the long tradition of the classroom hamster could give rise to negative ideas about animals in captivity. …

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