Richard, King of English Monarchs; Answers to Correspondents

Daily Mail (London), September 21, 1996 | Go to article overview

Richard, King of English Monarchs; Answers to Correspondents


William the Conqueror, William II, the Angevins and Plantagenets were Norman French. The Tudors were Welsh, James II Scottish, William of Orange Dutch, the Georges and Windsors German. Since 1066, has England had an English king?

RICHARD III, last of the Plantagenet line which ruled over England for more than 300 years, can claim to be the most English king.

He was the only truly English monarch, born of English parents, Richard, Duke of York and Lady Cecily Neville, with four English grandparents - maternally, Ralph, Earl of Westmorland, and Joan Beaufort, and paternally, Richard, Earl of Cambridge and Anne, daughter of Roger, Earl of March.

As proved by extant documents, he was born in 1452 at Fotheringhay Castle in Northamptonshire. He had an English queen, Lady Anne Neville, younger daughter of Richard and Anne Neville, Earl and Countess of Warwick. He died in 1485, leading his army into battle at Bosworth - the last English king to die on English soil doing so.

Mary Goose, Wisbech, Cambs.

When my mother was a child, her father used to cut bark from a tree which glowed in the dark when she hid it under the stairs. What sort of tree would this have been?

THIS phenomenon is most likely to be associated not with a particular type of tree, but with the common wood-rotting honey fungus having colonised the bark.

The phosphorescence this fungus emits by its metabolic activities can be quite dramatic in the dark.

Several species of honey fungus (Armillaria) throughout Britain are wood-rotting and capable of attacking live trees as well as dead wood.

They're woodland fungi but, as many gardeners know to their cost, also attack garden trees and shrubs. They often kill young conifers in forests, causing gaps in plantation.

Dr Steve Gregory, Forestry Commission Research Division, Roslin, Midlothian.

Now we've taken our holiday snaps, can anyone suggest a sensible use for the little plastic containers film comes in?

FURTHER to earlier answers, I keep one full of 20, 10 and 5p pieces in the car in case I'm ever in need of change for a car park or parking meter. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Richard, King of English Monarchs; Answers to Correspondents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.