Condom-Mania; HIV/AIDS Activists Are Part of the Problem

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), December 5, 2003 | Go to article overview

Condom-Mania; HIV/AIDS Activists Are Part of the Problem


Byline: Deborah Simmons, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The pope, a venerable leader throughout the Christian world, says don't do it. Tony Williams, the mayor of Washington, D.C., says, please, indulge yourself. Whose advice would you follow?

Both the pope and the politician are speaking of promiscuity in general and HIV/AIDS in particular. Monday, as part of World AIDS Day, while Pope John Paul II and the Roman Catholic Church were warning us against hedonistic lifestyles, the mayor and other lefties were promoting condoms. Renew your D.C. driver's license and pick up a condom when you're done. Boogie the night away at one of the city's hot spots and grab a condom in the ladies room before you hit the door. Got your eye on a sweet young thing, but don't have the dough to buy condoms? Stop by your neighborhood barbershop and pick up a few for free.

Thanks to the activists, who, for all practical purposes, reject any notion that abstaining from sex is the only surefire behavior to ward off HIV/AIDS and other consequences, condom-mania has taken the nation's capital by storm. Free condoms are literally everywhere. The mayor's point man on HIV/AIDS calls the city's initiative a "partnership" with beauty and barber shops, and clubs, bars and restaurants around the city. D.C. government offices will be dispensing condoms, too. The DMV holds you hostage with its morass and D.C. lawmakers can't figure out how to reform the school system. But dispense condoms? No problem.

Gone are the days when men had to visit a drug store to buy condoms - behind the counter and next to the nudie mags. Nothing is hush-hush. Everything (disgusting and morally wrong) is out in the open.

The D.C. government's liberal policies encourage pregnant teens to strut with their huge bellies, worrying not one iota about who will nurture her off-spring because there always is a good government program to take care of them. And the child's father needn't worry either. After all, he can choose not to use condoms, even freebies.

Yep, it's all about choices. The D.C. flock and the school system chose to push condom usage in the name of safe sex, while the safe-sexers blaspheme both the message and the messengers.

The condom campaigns, Cardinal Javier Lozano Barrigan said on World AIDS Day, "foster immoral and hedonistic lifestyles and behavior, favoring the spread of evil."

The safe-sexers don't want to hear such moralizing. They want the church and policy-makers to do as they say. …

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