Rush Is on for Secrets of a Wise Investing Policy

The Mail on Sunday (London, England), December 7, 2003 | Go to article overview

Rush Is on for Secrets of a Wise Investing Policy


Byline: RICHARD DYSON

Thousands of readers have ordered Recipes For Wealth, the book that introduces a new concept in investment management for the man in the street.

Produced by fund analyst Citywire in association with Financial Mail, it helps private investors tailor their broad investment mix - cash, bonds and shares - to match their age and aims.

Then it allows them to use up-to-date fund analysis to pick the best individual fund ingredients to deliver returns.

One reader who wasted no time sending off for his copy, Danuel Lamb, 66, a retired accountant from Twickenham, south-west London, is already an experienced investor. He and his wife, Judith, 50, both have enough pension income to live on, are mortgage-free and have substantial savings.

Here we road-test the Recipes For Wealth on the Lambs' portfolio.

More than 80 per cent of their total savings is in cash, in the form of deposit accounts, mini-cash Isas and building society bonds. Virtually all the remainder is invested in shares through pooled funds such as unit trusts and investment trusts. Some of these are in tax-free Peps or Isas. The Lambs also have a range of direct shareholdings in a few companies such as privatised utilities and demutualised building societies. Just a small slice is invested in funds of bonds.

According to Recipes For Wealth, the sixties mark a turning point in the portfolio of most investors. This is because the quest for capital growth gives way to the need for income and reduced risk.

The recipes suggested in the book reflect this change. For someone of the Lambs' age and cautious outlook, the recipe proposes a mix of 40 per cent cash, ten per cent shares in big UK companies and 50 per cent in bonds.

Why this mix? The high bond content is there to generate income. Bonds, which are far less risky than shares but still not as safe as cash, historically yield more income than cash on deposit. …

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