Target: George Soros

By Alterman, Eric | The Nation, December 29, 2003 | Go to article overview
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Target: George Soros


Alterman, Eric, The Nation


To declare oneself an unapologetic liberal in mainstream political debate these days is to invite abuse. The latest miscreant to step out of line is billionaire George Soros, who, after spending nearly $5 billion to promote democracy abroad, was so moved by the behavior of Bush & Co. that he decided to invest some back home to defeat them. Much of the reaction to Soros's announcement that he will spend $15.5 million to fund education campaigns with America Coming Together, voter mobilization drives with MoveOn.org and research activities with the Center for American Progress (CAP)--where I am a senior fellow--has verged on the comical. The Wall Street Journal is suddenly exercised about the political influence of "fat cats." A writer in Sun Myung Moon's Washington Times complains jingoistically that "the Hungarian native anointed himself a major player in American politics." RNC chair and ex-Enron lobbyist Ed Gillespie laments that Soros, a champion of campaign finance reform, is using what the RNC's Christine Iverson calls "an unregulated, under-the-radar-screen, shadowy, soft-money group" for his nefarious purposes.

But some of the criticism is worrisome. A writer on the conservative website GOPUSA.com termed Soros--get this--a "descendant of Shylock." Even more amazing, Conrad Black's neoconservative Jerusalem Post carried a piece in which a writer accused Soros of being a "man who spent a lifetime laboring to transform Henry Ford's International Jew from myth to reality." Meanwhile, the Journal editors, before issuing a rare correction, conveniently multiplied Soros's contribution to CAP by a Satanic 666 percent, terming it "reportedly...$20 million" and identifying the money as being directed toward "the likes of Bush-hating pundit Eric Alterman." (I wish I had known this when I happened to have dinner seated next to Soros a couple of nights before the editorial ran; those checks could use a few more zeros.)

The Washington Post editorial page, which many people continue to mistake for a centrist--or even liberal--voice, is also up in arms about Soros's giving. Donald Graham told me more than a decade ago that while he enjoyed reading the Journal editorial page, he would become "very uncomfortable if the tone of the Post editorial page was as harsh and intolerant." Well, Graham may want to start worrying. The Post has already adopted the Journal's ploy of attacking liberals who state truths gleaned from its own front page. This past summer, its editors went after Al Gore for leading his party "off a cliff" and validating "just about every conspiratorial theory of the antiwar left" when the former Vice President noted that the Bush Administration had engaged in "a systematic effort to manipulate facts in service to a totalistic ideology that is felt to be more important than the mandates of basic honesty." As I pointed out in this space in July, Gore was merely summarizing a view that any intelligent reader would have to draw from a 5,331-word story by Barton Gellman and Walter Pincus that the Post published the very same day.

Regarding Soros, the editors ask Democrats "thrilled with the Soros millions" to "imagine conservative financier Richard Mellon Scaife opening his bank account on behalf of Mr.

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Target: George Soros
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