Cardinal Sin of Not Listening to Women

Daily Mail (London), November 1, 1996 | Go to article overview

Cardinal Sin of Not Listening to Women


Byline: COLETTE DOUGLAS HOME

Abortion is something I loathe. I believe that every baby should be welcomed into the world, be they inconveniently illegitimate, less than physically or mentally perfect; be they black, white, male, female, rich or poor.

I hate the thought of terminations and yet I can have no truck with Cardinal Winning and his anti-abortion outburst. Let me explain why. The Catholic Church is one of the last bastions of male domination.

Women have no toe-hold in its hierarchy. Women are debarred from the priesthood and have no status within the Church. Yet just as priests are subject to the man-made rule of celibacy, Catholic women are subject to the man-made ban on contraception.

With the elan of the pot calling the kettle black, Cardinal Winning talked of the Labour Party being `almost Fascist' in denying a pro-life exhibition at its conference last year.

Yet the Church is ruled, undemocratically, by its cardinals.

They pay little heed to the views and experiences of women in their flock, yet presume to legislate for them. If Britain's political parties were to be bullied into following the cardinal's firmly held beliefs, in matters of reproduction women in Britain would be as dictated to as Afghan women under the Taleban.

Robbed of contraception, with abortion outlawed, we would become baby factories, providing the Church with new members, but with no voice of our own. What hope of a place on any career ladder then?

Remember how the Pope called on the women of Bosnia, who had been raped ,to resist the temptation to abort their babies? His speech held no offer of practical support. No mention of baby refuges; no word of Vatican funds for medical and housing aid.

As always, the women were meant to cope - or to feel guilty.

In Eire when a mere child was raped she could not have an abortion until a national hue and cry reversed the ruling.

For Catholic families the Church's teaching is clear; the child's life comes first. But from their moral high ground, and with complete certainty, the men who make up the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church hand down such edicts.

It is right that human life is held sacred. It is right that abortion should be practised only in the gravest of circumstances and with the keenest regard to the greater good. But I would not outlaw it, nor make criminal those driven to it in extreme circumstances.

I think a lot of women share my view because women acknowledge what Cardinal Winning shuts his eyes to. They know how hard it is to bear and rear a child. They know that an unwanted child has a troubled life. They understand that a woman abandoned when pregnant faces a tough future.

If the Church insists that the law is changed to force all women to complete their pregnancies, then the Church had better be there with help for those women, with a safety net for those children.

I didn't hear Cardinal Winning say anything like that but then why should I? He wasn't speaking to women.

Towering truth from a child given freedom of the fields

IF YOU kept a dog indoors, fed it a high fat and high sugar diet, drove it around in the car, gave it irregular exercise and demanded that it constantly master complicated tasks - you would not be at all surprised if it turned nasty.

Everyone knows that a dog needs good food and lots of healthy exercise.

Yet we feed our children chips and sugar drinks, park them in front of televisions and video games, keep them cooped up indoors or in polluted city streets and parks and wonder what is wrong with them.

Some adults want to drug them into behaving properly; some want to cane them; some to hire them therapists.

First I would try shipping them out to the country.

I would teach them to camp, canoe, swim, fish. I would take them for long walks and bicycle rides.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cardinal Sin of Not Listening to Women
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.