Studio Experiences in Art Education

By Brewer, Thomas M. | School Arts, December 2003 | Go to article overview

Studio Experiences in Art Education


Brewer, Thomas M., School Arts


This article addresses K-graduate curricular implications, contemporary aesthetics, and professional development issues relating to a combined graduate and undergraduate course entitled, Studio Experiences in Art Education, offered at the University of Central Florida.

Course Configuration

The studio experience course focuses on sculptural concepts similar to students' three-dimensional work, which moves from a flat two-dimensional surface, to some manner of relief, to freestanding three-dimensional works. Various constructed and assembled method and objects are implemented. Along with the sculptural work, some in-class drawing and printmaking instruction is provided, and students keep an ongoing sketchbook for sculpture proposal planning and observational drawings. This course is offered twice a year and can be repeated for up to nine hours of credit.

A principal way students may develop a new studio and aesthetic approach is by researching a contemporary artist working with similar alternative materials. They then compile historical information and write a critical review about three of the artist's works. The selected images are presented in a twenty-minute PowerPoint presentation early in the course. The course emphasizes that contemporary art has a time component and addresses nontraditional art-making and aesthetic considerations.

With the studio and contemporary art emphasis, students will develop and expand aesthetic and critical appreciation, which will impact their own studio work. Hopefully, this personal artistic knowledge will transfer into instructional practice and assist these future teachers in developing a wider aesthetic attitude toward the teaching of art.

Collaborations

Probably the most successful sessions of studio experiences have been held during summer sessions at the Atlantic Center for the Arts. Atlantic Center for the Arts, located in New Smyrna Beach, Florida is an artists-in-residence facility that provides artists with an opportunity to work and collaborate with master artists in the visual, literary and performing arts, and music composition. …

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