U.S. Judge in Blast at Britain; COURTROOM OUTBURST AS CAROLINE BEALE GOES FREE

Daily Mail (London), March 8, 1996 | Go to article overview

U.S. Judge in Blast at Britain; COURTROOM OUTBURST AS CAROLINE BEALE GOES FREE


Byline: TONY GALLAGHER

A NEW YORK judge launched a scathing attack on the British judicial system last night.

Judge Robert Hanophy spoke out as he freed Caroline Beale, the British woman who spent months on a murder charge in a tough American jail after being found with the body of her newborn baby.

Her father, Peter, branded the prosecution `barbaric' and `mediaeval' when a plea-bargaining deal was arranged earlier this week to give her probation.

But Judge Hanophy said: `That probation is going to be served in Great Britain, that great country that has convicted a great many people on the perjured testimony of police, allowed them to spend 15, 17 years in prison, did everything to see that they remain in prison, even though they knew they did not belong in there.'

He hit back at campaigners who claim Miss Beale, 32, should have been treated leniently because of her depression. As she listened, trembling, he said: `With people who kill their children,

Turn to Page 2, Col. 1

Continued from Page One

campaigners who claim Miss Beale, 32, should have been treated leniently because of her depression. As she listened, trembling, he said: `With people who kill their children, protecting the children rather than excusing the killer is the primary focus in this country. I can't fathom such a trial as either barbaric or uncivilised.'

Under the plea bargain, Miss Beale admitted second-degree murder. Her five-year probation sentence includes a year of psychiatric treatment at the Maudsley Hospital in London, beginning when she arrives home early today.

The judge even blasted the British law of infanticide, under which a mother tends to be treated leniently for killing a baby. He said: `Any law that allows a blanket exemption from prosecution or punishment to those who kill their children is a law which is primitive and uncivilised.

`Granting parents a law to kill their children harkens to uncivilised times. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Judge in Blast at Britain; COURTROOM OUTBURST AS CAROLINE BEALE GOES FREE
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.