Blood Sweat and Tears; Transfusion Turn-Off as Armchair Fans Tune in to TV Sport

Daily Mail (London), July 26, 1996 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Blood Sweat and Tears; Transfusion Turn-Off as Armchair Fans Tune in to TV Sport


Byline: ANDREW DENHOLM

THE summer television sporting bonanza is causing

Scotland's blood transfusion service a major headache.

From June to August is traditionally a lean time for donations as the population makes its annual holiday exodus, but this year supplies of blood have been particularly badly hit.

Transfusion service bosses plan to step up the campaign and aim to target towns and cities throughout Scotland with a series of one-day advertising schemes.

The supply problem started with the Euro 96 Football Championships in England when donors dropped by 8 per cent.

Now the National Blood Transfusion Service is worried about the effect of the Olympics in Atlanta.

And concern comes despite the success of a recent campaign to boost supplies with the slogan `GB - Give Blood Before You Go'.

Gordon Redpath, donor recruitment manager for the West of Scotland, said: `With these popular sporting events we are not getting the usual flow of people coming forward to give blood.'

He added: `Every summer numbers fall because people are off on holiday.

This year we ran a campaign to counteract that trend which proved successful.

`It seems that, on top of the usual fallow period, we have been badly hit by Euro 96 in England. Now we are worried by the Olympics.

`We expect to be hit particularly badly next week when the athletics are on as I can't imagine many people coming to give blood when Liz McColgan is running the marathon.'

The campaign saw donations rise by 10 per cent in July compared with the same month last year.

And because many of the constituent parts of donated blood have a short shelf life, donations need to be topped up.

Mr Redpath added: `Some blood parts can only be kept for five days and others for up to 35 days so we need to have people coming forward all the time.'

By ANDREW DENHOLMTHE SUMMER'S line-up of top sporting events so beloved of armchair fans everywhere is causing Scotland's blood transfusion service a major headache. The months of June to August are traditionally a lean time for blood donations as the population begins its annual exodus to sunnier climes, but this year supplies of blood have been particularly badly hit.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Blood Sweat and Tears; Transfusion Turn-Off as Armchair Fans Tune in to TV Sport
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?