It's My Turn to Write Letter to All Our Letters to the Editor Writers

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), December 28, 2003 | Go to article overview
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It's My Turn to Write Letter to All Our Letters to the Editor Writers


Byline: John Zimmerman

Most of you don't think war with Iraq is a very good idea. The political leader that interests you the most is President George Bush. The political leader that interests you the least is Gov. Rod Blagojevich. The local issue that raised your hackles more than any other was a Carol Stream state legislator's idea on how to control traffic on the expressways.

You are the people who have to date submitted 1,418 letters to the editor this year for our DuPage County edition. All were published in Fence Post, the name of our letters section.

First, let me deeply thank all these authors for their contributions. The letters to the editor section remains one of the most widely read and most important parts of the Daily Herald. Fence Post is your place to let your opinions be known. And you have done this with intelligence, wit and passion.

Looking back on Fence Post 2003, here is a snapshot of who wrote, and what you liked to write about:

The communities that have had the largest number of letter writers are Carol Stream, Glen Ellyn, Naperville and Wheaton. But Naperville is the letters leader, nosing out Wheaton by 25 commentaries, through today.

The issue that has generated the most letters is, predictably, the war with Iraq. It has put 275 letters on this page. And what do you think? It's close, but the war opponents prevail. Fifty-four percent of these letters were editorials against the war, with 46 percent in favor.

President Bush inspired many people to write as well. He was second in interest only to the war. Of these letters, 57 percent opined negatively for Bush; 43 percent positively.

(Now don't take this as proof of a "liberal media" or rock-solid evidence of DuPage County's prevailing opinion. I didn't deliberately censor any pro-war letters; in fact for the sake of interest, diversity and balance, I would like to see more letters in support of the war and President Bush. And keep in mind that the letters section is hardly a scientific poll.

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