The Tale of Pinocchio and What It Really Teaches Us about Ourselves; Children's Classic

Daily Mail (London), January 2, 2004 | Go to article overview

The Tale of Pinocchio and What It Really Teaches Us about Ourselves; Children's Classic


Byline: NED DENNY

PINOCCHIO by Carlo Collodi

PINOCCHIO is one of those children's stories that has truly entered into popular mythology - that wanton, magicallyextending nose an unforgettable symbol of mendaciousness, of the lie that won't lie low.

It pops up in political cartoons (on the face of our appropriately puppet-like Prime Minister, no less) and in art (the Italian sculptor Alberto Giacometti's The Nose is surely inspired by boyhood memories of the tale).

And, of course, there's the famous (albeit somewhat sweetened) Disney version of 1940, a perennial cartoon favourite. But how many of us are familiar with the original story, or with the man who wrote it?

Carlo Collodi was the pen name of Carlo Lorenzini, who was born in 1826 in the little village of Collodi in Tuscany.

After a career in the army, he turned his hand to journalism, editing his own satirical paper (Il Lampione) until it was shut down by the government.

In 1881, he sent to a friend, a newspaper editor in Rome, a short episode from the life of a wooden puppet. Would he, Lorenzini inquired, be interested in this 'bit of foolishness' for his children's section?

It was an immediate success and became a regular feature in the paper, the collected adventures finally being published in book form in 1883. The first English language version followed in 1892.

As Collodi tells it, Pinocchio is a far cry from the naughty but essentially sweet-natured character created by Walt Disney.

In fact, from the very moment of his transformation into a puppet from a mysteriously talking bit of wood ('just a common piece of wood, such as is used in stoves and fireplaces to kindle the fire and warm the rooms in winter'), Pinocchio is wholly objectionable. He is fickle, cowardly, dishonest, selfish and obtuse.

He is gullible, disobedient, greedy and thoroughly ungrateful. And, of course, he is always poking that absurdly long nose of his into places that shouldn't concern it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Tale of Pinocchio and What It Really Teaches Us about Ourselves; Children's Classic
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.