The Futurist Bookshelf

The Futurist, January-February 2004 | Go to article overview

The Futurist Bookshelf


ENVIRONMENT AND RESOURCES

Ark of the Broken Covenant: Protecting the World's Biodiversity Hotspots

by John Charles Kunich. Praeger. 2003. 208 pages. $44.95.

This book explores the world's vanishing regions of enormous biodiversity, what they mean for humanity, and what we can do to stop their disappearance. Arguing from a legal point of view, law professor Kunich believes that we have vastly more to gain than lose by legally protecting these fragile regions, and that forgoing them in favor of relatively minor and immediate returns is both foolish and dangerous.

BUSINESS

Business 2010: Trends and Technologies to Shape Our World

by Ian Pearson and Michael Lyons. Spiro Press. 2003. 232 pages. $27.

Long-time British Telecommunications futurist-in-residence Pearson offers uniquely insightful forecasts on new opportunities emerging from a range of technological breakthroughs. Covers pervasive computing, electronic cash, artificial intelligence, network communities, and much more.

ENVIRONMENT AND RESOURCES

Constant Battles: The Myth of the Peaceful, Noble Savage

by Steven A. LeBlanc with Katherine E. Register. St. Martin's Press. 2003. 269 pages. $25.95.

The battle over resources is what has motivated human beings from time immemorial, says Harvard archaeologist LeBlanc. Debunking the theory that our ancestors were more "in touch" with nature--never overgrazing or overfishing but only taking what they needed from the land--LeBlanc uses a historical approach to show how people have always warred when resources were scarce, often with devastating results. As our finite resources dwindle, LeBlanc foresees an apocalyptic future unless steps are taken now.

WORLD AFFAIRS

The End of Internationalism Or World Governance?

by J. [empty set]rstr[empty set]m M[empty set]ller. Praeger. 2000. 205 pages. $67.95.

Since the end of World War II, the world has moved relentlessly toward increased internationalism. But globalism has also caused economic stresses at the local level, strained the ability of nation-states to maintain their security, and sparked cultural and ethnic violence around the world. Author J. [empty set]rstr[empty set]m M[empty set]ller, the Danish ambassador to Singapore, here analyzes the major trends underlying the future of globalism and asks whether we are near its end--or on the brink of a new and truly international era.

BUSINESS

Experimentation Matters: Unlocking the Potential of New Technologies for Innovation

by Stefan H. Thomke. Harvard Business School Press. 2003. 307 pages. $35.

Harvard Business School professor Thomke examines technological innovations making an impact on the business world. His book explores why experimentation matters, new technologies for experimentation, how those technologies function in the workplace, and how to unlock their secrets for future business potential. Thomke introduces six principles for managing experimentation and offers ways for managers and entrepreneurs to extend experimentation capabilities beyond their organization.

BUSINESS

The Globalization of Nothing

by George Ritzer. Pine Forge Press. 2003. 259 pages. $32.95.

Globalization has led to a world of nullities: non-people, non-places, non-commodities, non-services--generic things (or nothings) devoid of distinctive substantive content. The systems that led to this culture of nothingness and that keep it in place are the subjects of this compelling volume. Sociologist Ritzer explores corporations imposing their standards on vast geographic areas (grobalization); dehumanization, disenchantment, and consumption; and such institutions as McDonald's, WalMart, Walt Disney World, and the shopping mall.

PUBLIC POLICY

Halfway to Everywhere: A Portrait of America's First-Tier Suburbs

by William H. …

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