The PC Politics of Censorship; Vulgarity Is O.K., Christianity Is Not

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 2, 2004 | Go to article overview
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The PC Politics of Censorship; Vulgarity Is O.K., Christianity Is Not


Byline: Diana West, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

My husband received the following letter from a waggish friend: "Jim - I just wanted to wish you and yours a happy holiday. I'll leave it at 'holiday' to avoid running afoul of the ACLU....

"On second thought, I withdraw 'holiday.' It derives from 'holy day,' which clearly presents problems. And 'season's greetings,' a well-known dodge, suggests other difficulties. With global warming, what is a season? So I'll just say, 'Timely greetings to you and yours.' Uh, wait. 'Yours' implies possession of the female. Maybe it should be, 'Timely greetings to you and those who, through their own free choice, the same choice we cherish in Roe v. Wade, choose to be associated with you?'

"Nor will I mention the so-called 'new year.' After all, other cultures celebrate their new year at other times. Who are we imperialists to demand our own?

"I find this time of year so difficult. Don't you?"

In a word, yes. Everyone has his - hers and its - war story from the Yuletide front, where Christmas comes under such heavy fire that Americans wave the pre-emptive white flag of "Happy Holidays" to avoid giving what is known as "offense" and receiving what feels like censure. Not that "Christmas" is the end-all of unmentionable. A story recently made the rounds about a Virginia teacher who spoke the utterly non-denominational (in fact, traditionally superstitious) injunction, "God bless you" over a sneezy student. Said student, sniveling wretch, proceeded to inform on the teacher for this act of New Blasphemy, for which the teacher was, incredibly, reprimanded.

Such developments make New York Governor George Pataki's posthumous pardon of Lenny Bruce's obscenity conviction all the more, well, offensive. Lenny Bruce, of course, was a comic celebrated since his fatal drug overdose for being the first performer to stand on a stage and give voice to every non-alphabet symbol on the typewriter, from !@# to $%^. (He also found fun in Saint Paul's sex life, Eleanor Roosevelt's anatomy and Jacqueline Kennedy's reaction to her husband's assassination.) Mr. Pataki saw fit to call the pardon "a declaration of New York's commitment to upholding the First Amendment."

What is there to say when "!@#$" gets a commitment to uphold the First Amendment, but "Merry Christmas" (not to mention "God bless you") is an offense punishable by sensitivity training? And how strange that Lenny Bruce's expletives deleted so long ago were effectively restored in the same month the Supreme Court effectively censored G-rated political speech by upholding the McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform act.

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