Awards & Prizes


Several major cities across the country ushered in the fall season with gala awards ceremonies. The stars at night were big and bright at the Rosewood Center for Family Arts in Dallas, where the Dallas Theatre League presented the 2003 Leon Rabin Awards. Lyric Stage's production of Titanic, directed by Drew Scott Harris, took the award for outstanding musical, also sweeping honors for supporting actress (Amy Mills), lighting design (Susan A. White) and music director (Scott A. Eckert). The Old Settler, at the WaterTower Theatre, was the league's play of choice, with its leading and supporting actresses--M. Denise Lee and Tippi Hunter--gaining recognition as well.

In the windy city, Famous Door Theatre's two-part production of The Cider House Rules blew the Jeff Equity Awards committee away, earning six prizes: best play, ensemble, directors (David Cromer and Marc Grapey), actor (Larry Neumann Jr.), supporting actress (Jennifer Pompa) and original music (Joseph Fosco). Curious George Goes to War and Pants on Fire, both from Chicago's Second City e.t.c., tied in the revue category. Curious George's director Ron West and performers Nyima Funk and Keegan-Michael Key also received Jeffs.

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The Theatre Alliance of Greater Philadelphia showered brotherly love--four Barrymore Awards--on People's Light and Theatre Company for In the Blood, which earned outstanding play, ensemble, direction (Abigail Adams) and leading actress (Roslyn Ruff). While the Philadelphia Theatre Company's The Last Five Years won for musical, the Prince Music Theater's Green Violin swept more awards in the category, receiving Barrymores for direction (Rebecca Bayla Taichman), lead actor (Raul Esparza), original music (Frank London) and choreography (David Dorfman).

For complete listings of the year's honorees, go to American Theatre's page on www. …

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