We Can't Let Just Any Old Tom, Dick or Giovanni Practise Law in This Country; Cops and Legal Regulators to Probe Controversial Lawyer Linked to Dundee FC over Whether He Is Qualified to Act as a Solicitor. His Clients Have Included Harold Shipman and Kenneth Noye

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), January 16, 2004 | Go to article overview

We Can't Let Just Any Old Tom, Dick or Giovanni Practise Law in This Country; Cops and Legal Regulators to Probe Controversial Lawyer Linked to Dundee FC over Whether He Is Qualified to Act as a Solicitor. His Clients Have Included Harold Shipman and Kenneth Noye


Byline: By Kevin Turner

DUNDEE FC director Giovanni di Stefano is facing probes from both the police and English legal watchdogs over his apparent lack of qualifications to act as a solicitor. The controversial Italian has acted as lawyer for serial killer GPHarold Shipman, whohanged himself in jail earlier this week.

Other high-profile clients included M25 road rage killer Kenneth Noyeand controversial property tycoon Nicholas van Hoogstraten.

But The Law Society of England and Wales have received no evidence from the Italian to support his claim to be legally qualified.

As pokes man admitted: ''This is a very serious matter. We cannot allow any Tom, Dick or Giovanni to come into the country and pretend they're a lawyer.''

Di Stefano, 48, refused to speak to the Record yesterday despite repeated calls to his mobile.

Amanwho described himself as ''a friend'' of di Stefano's claimed the Italian was''busy all day''.

Convicted fraudster di Stefano is best known in Scotland for his connections with Dundee. He promised to inject millions of pounds into the Dens Park club to turn them into a power in Europe.

A couple of big name players, Fabrizio Ravanelli and Craig Burley, did sign but Dundee called in the administrators just before Christmas and it was later revealed that the SFAhad never ratified di Stefano as a director of the club.

Yesterday, the Italian whomoved to the UK whenhewas five did issue a rambling statement which failed to address the questions raised of his legal status.

Di Stefano said of last night's BBC2 documentary on him, The Devil's Advocate: ''Sources have cited that both the Home Office andmore important the security services were furious with the BBC for producing such a documentary which is without doubt substantially complimentary of clients like Zelko Raznatovic (Arkan), President Milosevic, and Saddam Hussein.''

Later, di Stefano claims: ''The security services are not concerned with my clients Kenneth Noye, Jeremy Bamberand the late Dr Shipman.

''They are, however, extremely concerned that President Saddam Hussein may actually receive a fair trial.''

As news of Shipman's prison suicide broke on Tuesday, di Stefano who claims to be a qualified Italian lawyer gave several television interviews as the serial killer's ''lawyer''. …

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We Can't Let Just Any Old Tom, Dick or Giovanni Practise Law in This Country; Cops and Legal Regulators to Probe Controversial Lawyer Linked to Dundee FC over Whether He Is Qualified to Act as a Solicitor. His Clients Have Included Harold Shipman and Kenneth Noye
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