Bush's Coming Amnesty Plan: The Bush Administration's Plan to Give Amnesty to Millions of Illegal Aliens Would Prove to Be an Even Bigger Disaster Than Previous Amnesties

By Jasper, William F. | The New American, January 12, 2004 | Go to article overview

Bush's Coming Amnesty Plan: The Bush Administration's Plan to Give Amnesty to Millions of Illegal Aliens Would Prove to Be an Even Bigger Disaster Than Previous Amnesties


Jasper, William F., The New American


Get ready for a battle royale to save our borders. The Bush administration and pro-immigration invasion Democrats and Republicans in Congress are planning a big move this year to give amnesty to millions of illegal aliens now residing ill the United States. President Bush and his counterpart in Mexico, President Vicente Fox, were forced to put this scheme on hold in 2001, following the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Now the plan is back, along with a multitude of connected initiatives to deluge the U.S. with waves of legal immigrants, "refugees," "temporary workers" and your standard variety of illegal alien border jumpers.

Republicans and conservatives maintained a continuous cannonade against President Clinton for his blatant disregard of our borders and his efforts to swell the Democrat Party's voting ranks by giving citizenship to hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens. Continuing these policies, they warned, would lead to national suicide. Many of those voices, however, have been strangely mute as President Bush has continued, and in some cases expanded, Clinton's suicidal immigration policies. Some have actually switched from jeering to cheering, apparently convinced that any policy, no matter how bankrupt, destructive or unconstitutional, suddenly becomes beneficial when backed by Republican Party leadership.

The Bush administration sent some important signals on this front in December. First, Homeland Security Secretary Tom Ridge sent up a flare at a December 9 town hall-style meeting at Miami Dade College. A Copley News Service report of the event on December 11 made the following observation:

   In the strongest sign to date that the
   Bush administration is considering
   a major immigration initiative next
   year, Homeland Security Secretary
   Tom Ridge has called for "some
   kind of legal status" for the estimated
   8 million to 12 million immigrants
   living illegally in the United
   States.

   Ridge, who oversees the nation's
   borders, also said that such an unprecedented
   legalization program
   should be coupled with a decision
   about "what our immigration policy
   is," followed by a firm commitment
   to enforce it.

What does the Bush legalization process mean? "I'm not saying make them citizens, because they violated the law to get here," Ridge said at the Miami event. "You determine how you can legalize their presence. Then, as a country, you make a decision that from this day forward ... this is the process of entry, and if you violate that process of entry we have the resources to cope with it."

Amnesty Disaster Replay

Legalize their presence but never allow them to become citizens? Does this mean that they would become permanent legal aliens? Mr. Ridge knows that is an absurd notion; once the millions of illegals are legalized, the political pressure will build inexorably to grant them full citizenship.

And what of Secretary Ridge's talk about getting tough "from this day forward"--meaning after the legalization? "We've heard that one before," says Karl Nelson, a retired investigator for the former Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). "Look, that's what the immigration 'reformers' promised with the 1986 IRCA [Immigration Reform and Control Act] amnesty," Nelson told THE NEW AMERICAN. "But what really happened? Most of INS resources were shifted over to processing nearly three million aliens for amnesty. Did we get the promised enforcement increases? No. Did that amnesty satisfy the amnesty advocates? No. They immediately pushed for widening the amnesty and granting innumerable exceptions. And the [Reagan-Bush] administration caved in. Did we get control of our borders as promised? No. As everyone should know by now, our borders continued to be overrun--and still are being overrun. Show me one reason why we should trust in the new promises when the record shows that all similar promises in the past have been broken. …

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