FACT Act Schedule Setters Urged to Make Adjustments

By Paletta, Damian | American Banker, January 26, 2004 | Go to article overview

FACT Act Schedule Setters Urged to Make Adjustments


Paletta, Damian, American Banker


Parts of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act will not take effect until Dec. 1, but some bankers are saying there still may not be enough time to get ready for the act's long list of requirements.

Last month the Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Trade Commission proposed two deadlines for complying with the new law, which sets requirements for credit granting, the use of consumer data, protection from identity theft, and other matters. New requirements created by the act that do not entail major operational or technological changes by banks or other businesses would take effect March 31; those that do would take effect Dec. 1.

The schedule unsettled some banking groups and banks.

C.R. Cloutier, the chairman of Independent Community Bankers of America, wrote that banks would need more time to comply because the actual implementing rules, which will spell out how to satisfy all the act's requirements, have not even been proposed yet. He suggested that instead of one hard deadline of Dec. 1 for the more complex requirements, the agencies should set "staggered" deadlines to ease the transition.

Patricia N. Grace, a counsel at HSBC Bank USA, asked that the agencies either wait to set deadlines until certain regulations were final, or push the ultimate compliance date later into 2005.

"Establishing an effective date that is unnecessarily premature will jeopardize the ability of financial institutions to properly and effectively make the required changes," she wrote. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

FACT Act Schedule Setters Urged to Make Adjustments
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.