Spotlight on Rosenbaum Fine Art

By King, Carol | Art Business News, January 2004 | Go to article overview

Spotlight on Rosenbaum Fine Art


King, Carol, Art Business News


When asked how Rosenbaum Fine Art has thrived for nearly four decades in a marketplace that can be tumultuous at best, Chairman Marvin Rosenbaum draws a parallel between himself and comedian Dudley Moore.

"When people asked Dudley Moore, 'What makes a great comedian?' His answer was, 'Timing,'" Rosenbaum said. "During 40 years of business, I, too, have had the fortune of being in the right place at the right time. When investment art was hot, I was there. When posters were the better sellers, we had them to offer. When limited editions were the rage we, were there to supply them. I think that our strength has been that we have a good sense of timing, which translates into an understanding of the marketplace."

He stresses that an indispensable support staff, a devotion to customer service and a work ethic of diligence and devotion have all contributed to his company's longevity and growth. Perhaps, however, it is Rosenbaum's innate business sense that is his company's greatest asset.

Rosenbaum got his start in the art trade While working in Italy during the 1960s."I had always had an interest in architecture and an interest in art," he said. "While I was overseas, I purchased some paintings that I liked. Other people saw them, admired them and asked me to buy artwork for them, too. So, I began importing paintings and became an art dealer. I saw a niche that I was able to fill."

Thus, in the mid 1960s, EAC Corporation was born, and in the 1970s, it became Rosenbaum Fine Art. The company began in New York as a supplier of investment art, selling original paintings by Chagall, Picasso and Miro. It evolved to include the sale of limited-edition prints on paper as well as sculpture and works in glass, textiles and hand-painted pottery. Now headquartered in Boca Raton, Fla., Rosenbaum Fine Art's 70,000-square-foot facility houses an artist's studio, a frame factory, a distribution facility and a showroom.

The company represents the work of more than 100 artists and offers a diversified line of artwork ranging from abstract to impressionistic to realistic. "Our product offerings vary," noted Rosenbaum. "It's hard to define what artwork moves me and why. It's like picking between a singer who is pleasant to the ear and a singer who is comparable to Jose Feliciano or Liza Minelli. Somehow the producers at MGM and Sony know how to pick the product that is right. It's similar for me as an art dealer. When artists come to us, we look at their body of work and we get a feel about where they can go with good direction. When we feel that an artist has 'something,' we will sign him or her to an exclusive contract."

Artists represented by the company include Melanie Boone, Scott Hile and Kirt Brown, all of whom have been with Rosenbaum for more than 20 years, as well as Celia Judge, John Karam, Yvette Arteaga, Marco Galaviz and Mary Kreuziger.

In addition to its gallery-related offerings, the company caters to the interior design market and has showrooms set up throughout the country the Decorative Center in Houston, the World Trade Center in Dallas, the International Home Furnishings Center in High Point, N.

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