Union Goes to Court over Airport Workers; AFGE Files to Overturn Ban on Collective Bargaining for Security Screeners

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), January 24, 2004 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Union Goes to Court over Airport Workers; AFGE Files to Overturn Ban on Collective Bargaining for Security Screeners


Byline: Tom Ramstack, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The American Federation of Government Employees (AFGE) is trying again to unionize airport security screeners by filing an appeal against the government's efforts to block organizing efforts.

The AFGE filed a motion Jan. 15 in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia to overturn a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) ban on collective bargaining for screeners.

The AFGE appeal says the ban violates constitutional rights and federal laws that allow workers to join unions.

In January 2003, TSA Administrator James Loy, a retired Coast Guard admiral, issued an order that said screeners, "in light of their critical national security responsibilities, shall not as a term or condition of their employment be entitled to engage in collective bargaining or be represented for the purposes of engaging in such bargaining by any representative or organization."

Mr. Loy left the TSA on Nov. 25 to become deputy secretary of the Department of Homeland Security.

"Our position has not changed," said Chris Rhatigan, TSA spokeswoman. "We feel that our federal security work force needs to have the flexibility to deploy screeners when and where we need them. To have groups of screeners gathered together collectively to bargain with us is unacceptable."

So far, the TSA has won all legal challenges to its ban on unions.

In an earlier AFGE lawsuit, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia ruled in November that the Federal Labor Relations Authority had the jurisdiction to determine whether the TSA could forbid union organizing among screeners.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Union Goes to Court over Airport Workers; AFGE Files to Overturn Ban on Collective Bargaining for Security Screeners
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?