Snowy Plover Recovery Debated

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), November 24, 2003 | Go to article overview

Snowy Plover Recovery Debated


Byline: Winston Ross The Register-Guard

FLORENCE - Thanks in part to the systematic poisoning of up to 200 crows, ravens and red foxes, it was a good year for the Western snowy plover on the Oregon Coast.

In fact, it was the best year since wildlife biologists started keeping track of the threatened species. While that's cause for relief, neither side of a long-simmering controversy about how far to go to protect the fragile birds is celebrating.

Biologists note that one improved year does not indicate a full recovery. And Coos County Commissioner John Griffith - who loudly criticizes the 18 miles of beach area closed off to protect the plover - says if the lack of predators are to thank for the recovery, then predators - not humans - should be blamed for the species' downfall.

"You can put a fence up around the nest, but as soon as they hatch, they dry their feathers and then run, crows eat them," Griffith said.

Wildlife biologist Dave Lauten said predator control probably played a big role in this year's comeback. The success rate for fledglings had been averaging 30 percent in recent years, and this year it shot to 46 percent, a good indication that they're surviving after they leave the nest.

Biologists reduced the predator population by injecting a pesticide into chicken eggs, which are then placed near plover nesting areas. The poison kills what eats it but then breaks down as the animal dies, so it doesn't poison anything else. The tactic has proven effective, Lauten said.

But there are other factors that may have contributed to the plovers' good numbers this year, including weather, public education and habitat improvement projects. The small, pale shorebirds prefer coastal sand spits, dunes, beaches at creek and river mouths and salt pans at lagoons and estuaries.

Regulators closed off 18 1/2 miles of territory during the plover breeding season, which runs from April to early August, arguing that the encroachment of European beach grass, the development of dune areas and humans disturbing nesting sites have contributed to the species' demise. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Snowy Plover Recovery Debated
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.