A Soviet Reunion: Toward a Single Economic Space

By Jellinek, Robert | Harvard International Review, Winter 2004 | Go to article overview

A Soviet Reunion: Toward a Single Economic Space


Jellinek, Robert, Harvard International Review


When the Soviet Union dissolved 12 years ago, the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) formed as a loose coalition in its place. A significant step toward tightening the coalition was made at a summit at Yalta on September 19, 2003, aimed at establishing a Single Economic Space (SES) that would unify CIS markets in a way not seen since the Soviet Union's collapse. Belarus, Kazakhstan, Russia, and Ukraine spearheaded the initiative, calling for an economic union that would eliminate internal trade barriers and customs and establish a central trade commission with supreme trade authority over participating states. As with past attempts to form an economic union among former Soviet republics, the terms of the agreement have been subject to heated debate and the union finds opposition on many fronts. The establishment of the SES signals a willingness of CIS members to integrate their markets and participate in the international economy. Although there undoubtedly will be difficulties along the path to an economically unified CIS, the integration is necessary and must be seriously pursued to prevent the CIS members from lagging behind their Western European neighbors.

The proposal comes at a time when many states are about to accede to the World Trade Organization (VETO) and the European Union, and even more are being considered for these organizations. This is both a catalyzing and complicating factor for the creation of the SES. Western European markets have long been off-limits to the former Soviet republics. AS a number of Baltic and Eastern European states have sufficiently developed their markets to the standards of the European Union, the remaining republics are all the more ostracized. In order to develop their own markets and become more attractive to foreign investors, Russia and its non-EU neighbors must first find an alternative to trading with their western counterparts. However, lagging domestic markets and the scarcity of trading partners may prove the determining factors that make the SES more successful than past attempts to unify markets in the CIS.

If successful, the SES will bring attention to an area rich in resources but still largely inaccessible due to economic immobility: Open access to the region's energy resources will be the highlight of economic integration in Russia and Central Asia. Given the current instability in the Middle East, Central Asian energy markets may prove extremely attractive to foreign investment once the markets have been integrated. The integration process, however, will involve great risks, as the energy markets in participating countries are not equitable. Russia and Kazakhstan have much to gain, given their abundant resources and inexpensive methods of production. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A Soviet Reunion: Toward a Single Economic Space
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.