Area Museums Salute Black Culture, History

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 6, 2004 | Go to article overview

Area Museums Salute Black Culture, History


Byline: Helen C. Hunt Medill News Service

February is Black History Month and a good time to experience the richness of African-American culture in Chicago.

Start with a tour: Chicago Neighborhood Tours offers a close-up look at historic Bronzeville. This vibrant neighborhood was a major destination for blacks moving from the South and remains an important cultural center. The tour takes you to locations like the DuSable Museum of African American History, the Little Black Pearl Workshop and the Art Park at the CYC/Elliott Donnelley Youth Center. The next tour is scheduled for 10 a.m. Saturday. It departs from the Chicago Cultural Center, 77 E. Randolph St., Chicago. Tickets are $25 for adults and $20 for seniors and students. A light refreshment is included with the tours, which last about four hours. (312)742-1190

Listen up: While on the South Side, check out "Sweet Home Chicago: Big City Blues 1946-1966," at the Museum of Science and Industry at 57th Street and Lake Shore Drive. The exhibition explores how rural and urban traditions impacted the blues, Chicago's impact on the music and how white players from the United States and Europe incorporated the blues into rock 'n' roll. It continues through June 20. Museum hours are 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday to Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p. …

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