'Exposure' Not New for TV

By Thames, Lamar | The Florida Times Union, February 7, 2004 | Go to article overview

'Exposure' Not New for TV


Thames, Lamar, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Lamar Thames, Clay County Line general manager

I remember gathering around the small black and white television set at my grandmother's house in Reddick one Sunday evening many years ago, awaiting the start of The Ed Sullivan Show.

Television was new to me and I don't think my family had one at that time. That my grandmother had a set is still somewhat of a mystery to me. She was a strict churchgoer who didn't believe in "exposing" young children, or adults, for that matter, to some of the more worldly things on television and in the movies.

But once those "half-naked dancing girls" appeared on the Sullivan show, the television set was shut off for the rest of the night. It might have been a permanent status for all I know. But I remember being disappointed in not being able to watch the rest of the show.

So, it was with that thought in mind that I reflected on Janet Jackson's halftime exhibition at the Super Bowl Sunday night. My wife and I were already somewhat aghast by what transpired at halftime and when Janet and Justin Timberlake staged their pseudo-sexual performance leading up to the grand finale, we were incredulous that CBS and its sponsors had allowed those kinds of antics.

Of course, after Janet's leather bustier popped off "unexpectedly" and left a portion of her anatomy "exposed," we were both in disbelief.

My immediate thought was to check the time and see if this was still prime time television. Since it was approximately 8:38 p.m., I was sure that my 9-year-old grandson was still glued to the set. …

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