Cyndi Lauper Is Unabashed, as Usual

By Peralta, Eyder | The Florida Times Union, February 22, 2004 | Go to article overview

Cyndi Lauper Is Unabashed, as Usual


Peralta, Eyder, The Florida Times Union


Byline: EYDER PERALTA, The Times-Union

The days of slap-on bracelets are far gone, but last night at the Florida Theatre, those pieces from the past were still there. It was a night of pleather jackets and multi-colored plastic jewelry. People were there to relive their past, the days of The Goonies and Madonna and, of course, the darling of the mismatched and misunderstood generation, Cyndi Lauper.

But Lauper took the stage without a single trace of that girl from back when. She was dressed in an elegant knee-high skirt and a simple white shirt under a black jacket.

She started things off with Etta James' At Last. Her voice resonated, even through the roar of the audience. Right there, you could tell that there was nothing she could possibly do to disenchant this crowd. They were there to see her, in all her 50-year-old splendor.

What's still surprising is how talented Lauper really is. Her voice on songs like At Last, If You Go Away and Unchained Melody was piercing. But there's something about Lauper that doesn't let things remain too perfect.

She's random and silly. And for that she's Cyndi Lauper. When she went into a full-out salsa version of Stay, all hell broke loose. She sang on top of the piano -- in heels -- and ran into the crowd. She even managed to wobble her way onto one of the chairs. The crowd loved her for it. I think it drove the security guards a little bit mad. But soon her shoes were off and she was telling tales of old Brooklyn.

Lauper has a way with stories. She can tell a compelling one and at the same time work the crowd. Someone told her to shut up and play. She said, "You have issues. I understand that. I do, too."

And when someone confessed their love to her, she said in a very thick New York accent: "You don't even know me. …

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Cyndi Lauper Is Unabashed, as Usual
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