Ghettopoly: No! Pimp Juice: Yes? Board Game's Asian Creator Says He Followed the Lead of African Americans Who Profit from the Denigration of Black Culture

By Jones, Joyce | Black Enterprise, March 2004 | Go to article overview

Ghettopoly: No! Pimp Juice: Yes? Board Game's Asian Creator Says He Followed the Lead of African Americans Who Profit from the Denigration of Black Culture


Jones, Joyce, Black Enterprise


Ghettopoly or Pimp Juice. Which is more offensive? Some critics argue both, while others say only the former because a Taiwanese American created the board game whereas the latter is an energy drink created by black rapper Nelly.

Ghettopoly is a spin on the board game Monopoly. Machine guns, marijuana leaves, and basketballs replace the top hat, dog, and sports car playing pieces used in the classic Parker Bros. game. Instead of a bank, there is a loan shark tray that holds money to buy stolen properties that can be turned into crack houses. Other stereotypes include Ling-Ling's Massage Parlor, Hernando's Chop Shop, and Weinstein's Gold and Platinum Jewelry Store.

David Chang, a former financial services broker, got the idea from watching the MTV program Cribs, which depicts the "ghetto-fabulous" lifestyles of the rich and famous. Sold on the Internet (www.ghettopoly.com), the game hit Urban Outfitters retail stores last year. But it has since been pulled from store shelves after being met with protest and anger by the NAACP and other groups. The Lawyers' Committee for Civil Bights Under the Law and the Organization of Chinese Americans also have condemned the game. Thus far, the NAACP and other major black organizations have not shown the same moral outrage and concern regarding Pimp Juice (available in 20 U. …

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