Primate by Numbers

By Sison, Marites N. | Anglican Journal, February 2004 | Go to article overview

Primate by Numbers


Sison, Marites N., Anglican Journal


HOW DID Archbishop Michael Peers spend his days as a primate? The Anglican Journal gives you a bird's eye view, based on reports he submitted to the National Executive Council from September 1986 to December 1995 and the Council of General Synod from January 1996 to November 2003. The reports are incomplete, however--some were reportedly misplaced during staff changes--so the figures below are not the full total. Missing entries account for 22 months--less than two years out of 17 1/2--and those that remain show a tireless primate.

IT TOOK Archbishop Peers and his wife, Dorothy, nine days to find a house in Toronto when they moved from Regina after his election as primate in 1986. They looked at 66 houses.

DURING THE FIRST half of his primacy--9.5 years or 3,437 days--he spent 1,787 nights or 52 per cent at home, and 1,650 night or 48 per cent away from home.

SINCE 1986 he has undergone medical check-ups for a total of 4.5 days in 17.5 years.

HIS AVERAGE DAYS OFF work, including weekends, was two days a month. Since 1986, he logged 536 days off or an average of 29.7 days a year. (A full-time worker at Church House, excluding official holidays, gets 96.)

HE CALLED IN SICK for a total of 16 days from September 1986 to November 2003-0.2 per cent of a total of 6,265 days.

FOR THE 17.5 years he was primate, Archbishop Peers took 154.5 days of vacation leave, ah average of 8.5 days a year. That is nearly three weeks short of the vacation time he is entitled to.

FAMILY BUSINESS took him away from his normal routine for only 15 days between September 1986 and N0vember 2003.

HE TOOK A SABBATICAL of 127 days, during which he spent a week at home sorting personal books and papers (and gave away 23 cartons of books). He also learned "to cook a decent dinner," upgraded his computer skills, disengaged from work ("not difficult") and turned 60.

TURNING 60 was not particularly earthshaking, but he did notice that, "banks are friendlier."

A NORMAL day will find him reading six chapters of the Old Testament in the morning, a psalm at noon, and two chapters of the New Testament in the evening.

IN THE LAST 4.5 years, he has been more peripatetic, logging a total of 353 takeoffs and landings, 26. …

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