Education Leaders Gather to Set Research Agenda: Policy-Makers Cite Need for More Data on African American Educational Experiences

By Chew, Cassie M. | Black Issues in Higher Education, February 12, 2004 | Go to article overview

Education Leaders Gather to Set Research Agenda: Policy-Makers Cite Need for More Data on African American Educational Experiences


Chew, Cassie M., Black Issues in Higher Education


FAIRFAX, VA..

A recent Florida A&M University engineering graduate with a 3.9 grade point average was rated zero on a scale of one-to-10 by a hiring manager in terms of his employability with the firm. The hiring manager did not think the academic programs at the school, named "College of the Year" by Time magazine in 1997, provided the young professional the technology courses that would ensure success in the position.

This story was related by one of three dozen academic professionals attending a brainstorming session last month sponsored by the United Negro College Fund's (UNCF) Frederick D. Patterson Research Institute. The discussion focused on the critical issues that affect the success of educational pursuits among African Americans.

By the end of the three-hour session, many in the group cited the need for more research on African American educational experiences, including conducting and disseminating research on African American learning patterns as well as the institutions and settings in which African Americans are trained.

Group members also said that educational policies should be connected to such research and that research studies need to include African Americans on their teams.

Research, the participants said, is needed to arm policy-makers with the data to develop effective education policy and academic programs, and to make informed decisions about funding these programs. It also is needed to educate the decision-makers African American students encounter after completing their education.

Policy-makers often have "a lack of understanding of the broad role of HBCUs on the larger society," said Leslie L. Atkinson, director of government affairs for the UNCF. "Oftentimes the data is old and inaccurate, but it is being used in a way that it shapes perceptions."

Coined B.R.A.I.N.P.O.W.E.R., the annual two-part session of education professionals is a new initiative of the Patterson Research Institute. Twice a year the institute plans to bring national policy-makers together to discuss solutions to the critical issues that affect the educational resources for African Americans.

The institute's goals include a study of the obstacles and enablers of educational, occupational and economic status outcomes among African American students. It works to direct public policy that promotes access to education and success in educational programs, increasing the number of African American educators, and serves as a clearinghouse for data about the status of African Americans' educational pursuits.

Last month's meeting was convened "so we can come to a consensus about what those issues are," said Dr. M. Christopher Brown II, Patterson's executive director and chief research scientist. The institute plans to use the ideas raised during the brainstorming session to guide its public research and policy agenda during the course of the year, Brown said.

The institute also will use this data to develop a paper that outlines solutions to these issues and present the paper at its 2004 research conference in September, which also will commemorate the 50th anniversary of Brown v. …

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