The Ten Lenses: Building Personal Cultural Competence

By Rizzo, Rita | Nation's Cities Weekly, March 1, 2004 | Go to article overview

The Ten Lenses: Building Personal Cultural Competence


Rizzo, Rita, Nation's Cities Weekly


The magazine "Psychology Today" tells us in its August 1998 issue that stereotypes are an ingrained part of the thinking of most Americans. We make assumptions and take actions regarding others who are different than us based on ideas and impressions acquired during childhood.

In this "politically correct" era most Americans are cautious about verbalizing their views on race and culture, yet they continue to behave from a belief system that has perhaps not been examined in the context of their present day lives in a multicultural society.

Author, psychologist and diversity expert Mark Williams, in collaboration with the Gallup Organization and The Diversity Channel, has written a book entitled "THE 10 LENSES: Your Guide to Living and Working in a Multicultural World" (2001).

Mr. Williams has identified ten lenses or perceptual filters through which people view race and culture.

As individuals learn to better understand their own lenses and the lenses of others, they increase the possibility of building bridges, managing conflict, and finding common ground in cross-cultural situations.

These lenses influence all areas of American life. Once a person is able to identify his/her lenses they can then begin to minimize the weaknesses and maximize the strengths inherent in each lens, and can move towards inclusiveness, a perspective embraced in the eleventh lens that Mr. Williams has developed.

Key to obtaining this inclusive perspective is to understand all of the ten lenses people use to view those who are different.

* Assimilationists who want individuals to submerge their individual and cultural identities in favor of nationalistic and patriotic ideals.

* Colorblinds who see people as individuals and ignore race, color, ethnicity and other external cultural factors.

* Culturalcentrists who seek to improve the welfare of their cultural group by accentuating their history and identity.

* Elitists who believe in the superiority of the upper class and embrace the importance of family roots, wealth, and social status. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Ten Lenses: Building Personal Cultural Competence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.