Benchmarks & Barriers for People of Color in Higher Education

Black Issues in Higher Education, February 26, 2004 | Go to article overview

Benchmarks & Barriers for People of Color in Higher Education


Benchmarks & Barriers For People of Color In Higher Education

JUNE 17-19, 2004

Marriott Crystal Gateway Arlington, Virginia (Washington, D.C., metropolitan area)

A special conference commemorating the 20th anniversary of Black Issues In Higher Education.

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UPDATED REGISTRATION & CONFERENCE INFORMATION

Plan now to be a participant in this history-making conference. Act now!

About the Conference

Black Issues In Higher Education 20th Anniversary Conference & Celebration Benchmarks and Barriers for People of Color in Higher Education

June 17-19,2004 Marriott Crystal Gateway, Arlington, Virginia

* PROGRAM

Black Issues has assembled a "who's who" of American educational, political and social activists to make presentations at the Benchmarks & Barriers for People of Color in Higher Education conference. In addition, content sessions will be offered by practioners, researchers and other higher education advocates engaged in the ongoing struggle to ensure access and equity for people of color in American higher education.

Key Topics

* Affirmative Action/Racism/ Diversity

* Campus Climate/ Student Issues

* Teaching/Learning

* Leadership and Management Issues

* Recruitment and Retention

* Research

* Technology/Digital Divide

* Diversity/Multiculturalism

* Testing

* Federal Reauthorization and Public Policy

* Trustees and Governing Boards

* Community Colleges

* Faculty Rewards and Compensation Issues

* Philanthropy and Fund Raising

* The Gender Divide

* New Roles and Trends for HBCUs

* The Globalization of Education

* PARTICIPANTS

The conference will have universal appeal for educators and those who are interested in the important role education plays for the people of this nation, particularly students of color. Participants will include:

* Faculty

* Administrators

* Higher-education advocates

* Student-service professionals

* Trustees and governing-board members

* Admission and retention officers

* Researchers

* Diversity, affirmative-action and equity officers

* Development officers

A YEAR OF REMEMBRANCE AND CELEBRATION

2004 will mark two special events. First and foremost, it is the 50th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education decision that opened the doors of higher education to African American and other students of color. It also marks the 20th anniversary of Black Issues In Higher Education, the nation's pre-eminent magazine on issues affecting African Americans and other minorities and underrepresented groups in our nation's colleges and universities. Black Issues In Higher Education invites you to join us for a national summit, conference and gala befitting these two important anniversaries. This unique gathering will draw on all of the hard lessons learned from the past and from the people who have been at the forefront, in the trenches, and even on the sidelines during those eventful years. More importantly, this gathering will assess the triumphs, take inventory of the setbacks and plot a strategic agenda for the future. You won't want to miss this historic gathering.

TYPES OF PARTICIPATION

* Exhibitions

500-600 conference attendees will have ample networking time with exhibitors.

* Sponsorships

To demonstrate your support for diversity in higher education, a wide range of sponsorships are available (e.g. dinner, reception, luncheons, breakfasts, coffee breaks, etc.).

* Advertising

Advertising spots are available in the on-site conference edition, which will also be distributed to BIHE subscribers. …

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