College Alcohol Initiatives Praised; Center Honors Two Presidents

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 12, 2004 | Go to article overview

College Alcohol Initiatives Praised; Center Honors Two Presidents


Byline: Delphine Soulas, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Two university presidents were recognized Wednesday for forging new policies aimed at curbing alcohol abuse on college campuses.

The Center for College Health and Safety honored David Roselle, president of the University of Delaware, who instituted the first policy in the United States to notify parents when students break campus drinking rules, and Robert Carothers, president of the University of Rhode Island, who banned alcohol from all social events on campus, including at fraternities and sororities.

"I commend President Carothers and President Roselle for having the courage to change campus culture and create an environment that is safer for all students," center director William DeJong said.

In 1997, Mr. Roselle initiated a policy of sending letters to the parents of students who didn't abide by the campus alcohol policy. This original initiative, the first of its kind nationwide, was the first of a wave of stronger law enforcement and alcohol policies at the school.

Since then, he has implemented a "three strikes and you're out" suspension policy for alcohol violations and has prohibited fans from re-entering the stadium during football games.

The college teamed up with the city of Newark to curb alcohol-related incidents. As a result, the Newark City Council lowered the blood-alcohol level within city limits and restricted happy hours and times for discounted drink specials to between 4 p. …

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