A Women's History Month Quizzlet

Curriculum Review, February 2004 | Go to article overview

A Women's History Month Quizzlet


1. Which woman became Israel's fourth prime minister at the age of 71?

2. Which young Shoshone woman joined the Lewis and Clark expedition in North Dakota and served as their chief interpreter on the journey to the Pacific Coast?

3. Who was the first Black woman to win a Nobel Prize in Literature?

4. Which Chicana journalist and activist got her start during a 10-year stay in a tuberculosis sanitarium?

5. Eleanor Smeal, a three-time president of the National Organization for Women (NOW), was responsible for girls being able to

6. This English poet not only penned love poems in the 1800s but she also wrote pieces that raised awareness about social injustices. Who was she?

7. Young Chinese-American sculptor and architect Maya Lin designed which two prominent American memorials?

8. As the first Black woman elected to Congress, this woman was a staunch supporter of the U.S. Constitution, tolerance and equal rights. Who was she?

9. Which "forgotten feminist" paved the way for the growth of women's studies in the United States but was turned on by the women's movement when she came out as a lesbian?

10. Which famous scientist did ground breaking research in primatology, proving that chimps were intelligent, emotional creatures living in complex groups who made and used tools?

11. Writer Amy Tan published a book in 1989 that educated many people about the traditions of an AsianAmerican family. What was the title?

12. Which First Lady established a center to offer treatment for addictive diseases after her own battle with alcohol and other drug addiction?

A Women's History Month Quizzlet Answers

1. Golda Meir took this post in 1969.

2. Native American Sacagawea helped guide Lewis and Clark to the Pacific Coast where she was reunited with her Shoshone tribe after being abducted several years earlier. …

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