Girl of Three Slips out of Nursery and Walks Home Alone

Daily Mail (London), March 20, 2004 | Go to article overview

Girl of Three Slips out of Nursery and Walks Home Alone


WHEN little Sophie Shakespeare found a door open at her nursery just before collection time, she decided to walk the half mile home by herself.

Five minutes later, her mother Ann arrived to pick her up - only to be told by frantic teachers that Sophie was missing.

And as the adventurous threeyearold was crossing two busy main roads notorious for speeding drivers, school staff and a distraught Miss Shakespeare were desperately searching for her.

It was only 20 minutes later, when Sophie's teenage brother Youssef found her in tears banging on the family's front door and phoned his mother, that the search was called off.

'The headteacher rushed me home and I just burst into tears.

It was terrible,' said Miss Shakespeare, who was so upset she had to be prescribed tranquillisers by her doctor.

'I kept thinking what if she had been hit by a bus or even kidnapped by a stranger.

'It is astonishing that no one had seen her or stopped her, there are lots of schools in the area and there must have been parents picking their kids up from school.' Miss Shakespeare, 38, said she now planned to withdraw Sophie from Shenley Fields Nursery in Northfield, Birmingham.

The mother- of-four said her youngest child was a 'very independent-minded' girl but nursery staff should have been more vigilant. …

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