PATSY PAST-IT; as a Child She Was the Toast of Hollywood. as Liam Gallagher's Wife She Was the Queen of Cool Britannia. Now Patsy Kensit Is Trying Her Luck in TV's Least Glamorous Soap Opera. So How Did It Come to This?

Daily Mail (London), March 20, 2004 | Go to article overview

PATSY PAST-IT; as a Child She Was the Toast of Hollywood. as Liam Gallagher's Wife She Was the Queen of Cool Britannia. Now Patsy Kensit Is Trying Her Luck in TV's Least Glamorous Soap Opera. So How Did It Come to This?


Byline: KATHRYN KNIGHT

A DRAUGHTY room in a small village in the Yorkshire Dales: in the corner, a petite blonde woman sits clutching a polystyrene cup of coffee as she stares at her script. Around her, assorted people chat idly, seemingly oblivious to the famous young woman in their midst.

Welcome to a gathering of the Emmerdale cast, where Patsy Kensit - the former 'rock chick' and serial divorcee - is preparing for her debut appearance as Sadie King, the rural soap's feisty new femme fatale. Given the unglamorous nature of rehearsals - not to mention the soap's setting, it is, you might think, something of a comedown for a woman once dubbed the Queen of Cool Britannia.

Indeed, Patsy's decision to take the role has apparently caused widespread mirth among certain of her 'friends'.

Nor can she expect a warmer reception when filming starts, for while the show's executives have been excitedly trumpeting her arrival, her signing has been less well received among the cast, who are not only furious at the 35-yearold's [pounds sterling]90,000 salary, but also by the excited chatter about her 'sensational' storylines.

Indeed, such is their annoyance that they have already given her the nickname, 'Special K', in reference to the 'special' treatment they think she will receive.

As one source on the soap puts it: 'The wardrobe department have already shelled out a fortune on sexy designer outfits from Harvey Nichols in Leeds.

This in itself has caused some pursed lips among the female cast as everyone else is dressed from the High Street.

'And it didn't help when a spokeswoman said that she would bring a touch of class to the show. That didn't go down well at all.' So far, so 'showbusiness' - bickering and resentment are the staple fare of the fragile luvvie class. Nonetheless, despite Kensit's own rather soap opera life - three rock star husbands, tempestuous affairs with, among others, an international footballer, and the inevitable rehab - a role on one of the less fashionable TV series is something of a comedown, no matter how 'glamorous' the character.

After all, this is the woman whose Bardot-like beauty led to her being dubbed a 'star' by none other than Dame Elizabeth Taylor. She was just six years old when she met Miss Taylor on the set of the 1976 film The Blue Bird.

But by then Patsy was already an established child star having won her first role in The Great Gatsby alongside Robert Redford when she was just four. And who can forget her cherubic face in the Bird's Eye peas advert? It wasn't just Elizabeth Taylor who predicted a golden future for her. The once luminous blonde with big blue eyes was hailed as being the next Brigitte Bardot.

then, has it come to this?

Certainly, Patsy does not need the money. After her three marriages she is said to have accumulated a small fortune in divorce settlements, starting with her split with her first husband, Dan Donovan, keyboard player with the Eighties band Big Audio Dynamite, and her subsequent divorce from Simple Minds frontman Jim Kerr. Neither liaison lasted longer than three years.

Her most recent divorce, meanwhile, from Oasis wild man Liam Gallagher, reputedly swelled her bank account by another [pounds sterling]10 million. Her [pounds sterling]1.5million four-storey Notting Hill home is paid for and her film work, while generally unremarkable, has proved reasonably lucrative. So, it is unlikely that her decision to take the job was motivated by money.

The answer, perhaps, lies in a revealing comment made by Patsy during an interview when just a young teenager. 'I don't care about money or anything like that,' she said.

'All I want is to be more famous than anyone or anything.' While, of course, we must not take the utterings of the teenage Patsy too seriously, her words go some way to explaining her extraordinary determination to stay in the limelight.

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PATSY PAST-IT; as a Child She Was the Toast of Hollywood. as Liam Gallagher's Wife She Was the Queen of Cool Britannia. Now Patsy Kensit Is Trying Her Luck in TV's Least Glamorous Soap Opera. So How Did It Come to This?
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