Food: The Lunchbox Gourmets

By Scelfo, Julie | Newsweek, March 29, 2004 | Go to article overview

Food: The Lunchbox Gourmets


Scelfo, Julie, Newsweek


Byline: Julie Scelfo

Stumped by what to pack in your kid's lunchbox? We talked to chefs, cookbook authors and assorted foodies--and it turns out that they're scratching their heads, too. After all, the box lunch is a challenge. The food has to be reasonably healthful. And it has to entice some of the world's pickiest eaters. Lunches have to be quick and easy to prepare. And they have to survive up to five hours without refrigeration. But while food pros may feel the same brown-bag anxiety we do, they have better solutions. Here are a few of their suggestions:

Mix it up. By the time she gets home from work, Tanya Wenman Steel, an editor at Bon Appetit magazine, has about 20 minutes to make dinner and pack the next day's lunches for her 6-year-old twins, Will and Sanger. Still, a successful lunch, she says, must combine the essential kid courses: a drink, an entree, nibbles and a treat. She always includes a protein, like a thin slice of meatloaf with cranberry chutney on whole-wheat bread, stir-fried-steak in peanut sauce or a bran muffin split horizontally and slathered with cream cheese. To add variety, she packs a different drink each day, such as a yogurt smoothie, a box of milk or an apple-cranberry juice with a wedge of lime. Steel also involves her sons in the lunch-packing process, giving them small tasks, like putting dried fruit into plastic bags. "When they do this, I find they are more likely to eat all of their lunch the next day," she says.

Let them play with the food. To keep her teenage daughter and son interested, Sara Moulton, host of Food Network's "Sara's Secrets," packs taco kits--separate plastic bags of shredded cheese, lettuce, salsa, taco shells and rotisserie chicken she buys precooked at the store. DIY snacks are also a hit with the 5- and 7-year-old sons of chef Mario Batali, who wraps up slices of cold pizza with hot sauce on the side so the kids can dip. "It's all about fun finger food," says Batali. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Food: The Lunchbox Gourmets
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.