Students Take Phone Battle to Capitol; They Oppose Law on Cell Phones in School

By Maraghy, Mary | The Florida Times Union, March 24, 2004 | Go to article overview

Students Take Phone Battle to Capitol; They Oppose Law on Cell Phones in School


Maraghy, Mary, The Florida Times Union


Byline: Mary Maraghy, Clay County Line staff writer

A dozen Middleburg High School students lobbying to change a Florida law regarding cell phones in schools have earned an invitation to speak in Tallahassee.

Since August, students in Marty Mayer's Speech II class have been doing research, making telephone calls and writing letters in an effort to get Florida lawmakers to make cell phones legal on school campuses for safety reasons, especially because pay phones are becoming obsolete.

"We don't have pay phones anymore. If you don't have a ride after school, you're stuck here," student Dean Boyles said.

A year ago, pay phones were removed from all Clay County high school and junior-senior high school campuses because students were vandalizing them and making prank 911 calls, said Darlene Mahla, public relations officer for the Clay County School Board.

Under the existing Florida statute, possessing a cell phone on a school campus is a felony. But the law is not enforced, and interpretations vary from county to county and even from school to school, students have discovered.

Under Clay County's policy, Mahla said, students may bring a cell phone to school but it must be left in a locker. To date, this school year, there were 105 suspensions for cell phone offenses -- 81 of them involved a student using a cell phone during school hours, and 24 for possessing a cell phone in the classroom.

Mayer's students surveyed school systems throughout Florida and found that policies varied and that some school systems had no policies.

The students said that according to their research, 51 percent of Florida high school students carry a cell phone.

When the Florida statute was last amended in the 1980s, wireless communication devices were linked to drug trafficking and thus outlawed in schools. Then school officials worried that students would use them to cheat on tests.

In Clay County, students caught carrying a cell phone can get three days of in-school suspension for the first offense. If using the phone at school, a student can be suspended out of school for three days.

"We thought that was a bit ridiculous," student Sarah Gaynor said.

Students agree that they should not use the phones during school, but they said they think they should be allowed to bring them to call for a ride after school or in case of emergencies. Some students at Columbine High School during the shooting spree were saved because they had cell phones, students said. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Students Take Phone Battle to Capitol; They Oppose Law on Cell Phones in School
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.