Worship in Motion Women Dance at Naperville Church to Celebrate Faiths from around the World

By Edman, Catherine | Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 28, 2004 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Worship in Motion Women Dance at Naperville Church to Celebrate Faiths from around the World


Edman, Catherine, Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL)


Byline: Catherine Edman Daily Herald Staff Writer

Sitting in a church pew periodically singing - and rarely making eye contact with others - left something to be desired for Ann Kuhn.

She liked, and still likes, attending Mass. She just needed something a little more interactive.

Perhaps the mother of seven was used to a tad bit more activity in her life. She definitely was open to change.

It was during a church retreat in 1989 that she first saw and took part in the Dances of Universal Peace, where women gathered in a circle to sing and dance prayers based on the major world religions.

"It appealed to me because it included my whole being: my body, mind and spirit. There's movement and interaction with people in the circle," the 72-year-old dance instructor said.

Once a month, she's now teaching those dances to a whole new generation of women at the First Congregational Church in Naperville.

"I love it so much, so I got a mentor to teach me (to be a teacher)," Kuhn said. "It's very hard to learn because you have to memorize the movements, the words, tell people about where the dance is from and teach them about the dance."

But perfection is not the goal of the dancers. It's not like ballet, where precision of movement is everything.

Instead, it's worship in motion, they say.

"Way to use the body in prayer," said Cyndi Gavin of Naperville, who introduced the group to her church. "It combines music, songs and movement in a prayerful way - in community."

The dances themselves first sprung up in the 1960s in San Francisco as the creation of a man named Samuel Lewis, a follow of Sufism, or a mystical arm of Islam. After his death in the 1970s, they changed to honor all the major religions, Kuhn said.

That includes Christianity, Islam, Sikhism, Judaism, Zoroastrianism, Hinduism and Buddhism.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Worship in Motion Women Dance at Naperville Church to Celebrate Faiths from around the World
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?