Vital: The Drugs Don't Always Work Sometimes There Are Alternative Options

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), April 3, 2004 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Vital: The Drugs Don't Always Work Sometimes There Are Alternative Options


Byline: Paul English

ALTERNATIVE approaches to treatment of mental ill health are growing.

Campaigners claim medication itself is not enough, with critics of programmes such as Care In The Community arguing that the approach looks good on paper but is failing patients in practice.

Recent figures have shown that the number of people committing suicide in Scotland is on the increase. Last year alone in Glasgow around 100 people took their own lives.

Campaigners like Theatre Nemo's Isabel McCue claim early intervention and even simple talking therapies might be able to prevent some cases reaching this tragic conclusion.

Others have found approaches such as art and music therapy are crucial on a number of levels.

Dan Stradford, founder of Safe Harbor Project, the world's leading non-profit organisation for non-drug mental health education, insists groups such as Theatre Nemo can be very positive He says: 'It is remarkable how many non-conventional therapies will help alleviate the symptoms of mental illness. For example, art and music therapy. People with mental disorders commonly suffer from greatly altered thinking patterns and debilitated communication skills.

'Artistic expression, be it music, painting, writing, or other outlets, can act as a mental workout of sorts, allowing the person to put into motion in a safe and enjoyable way mental and social processes that may have fallen into disuse.

'They also allow the individual to communicate things that may be too difficult or painful to express through normal channels.'

Dan reckons that even simple achievements, such as painting a picture or performing in a play, can have a profound effect on someone's self-esteem.

He says: 'People with mental troubles commonly have serious morale problems because their value to the world has crumbled and personal productivity often comes to a standstill. Producing a painting or a play or perhaps a small concert can be strong medicine toward raising the individual's sense of self-worth and hope for the future. And there is no more powerful potion than hope.'

He adds: 'The simple use of work as a therapy, while perhaps seeming unconventional by today's standards, has been successful for centuries in helping the mentally unwell find their bearings again.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

Vital: The Drugs Don't Always Work Sometimes There Are Alternative Options
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?