Evaluation of Digital Technology and Software Use among Business Education Teachers

By Ellis, Richard S.; Okpala, Comfort O. | Journal of Instructional Psychology, March 2004 | Go to article overview
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Evaluation of Digital Technology and Software Use among Business Education Teachers


Ellis, Richard S., Okpala, Comfort O., Journal of Instructional Psychology


Digital video cameras are part of the evolution of multimedia digital products that have positive applications for educators, students, and industry. Multimedia digital video can be utilized by any personal computer and it allows the user to control, combine, and manipulate different types of media, such as text, sound, video, computer graphics, and animation. This paper examines the familiarity and use of these educational hardwares among business education teachers. Based on the affinity that younger teachers have for incorporating digital cameras and soft-ware applications into their curriculum, one conclusion from this research is for administrators to focus on seminars and training of educators that have been teaching for more than five years. The survey also found some differences in the use and comfort level among teachers of different ethnic background.

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The beginning of the new millennium witnessed an explosion in the utilization of computer technology by Business and Office Education teachers. Middle and High school students have grown up with computers and the Internet, they are accustomed to word-processing, and these students understand the rudiments of spreadsheet and database computer applications. The challenge for educators is to try and stay ahead of the technological trends and to select pedagogical products that are user-friendly and useful in the classroom. Digital Video cameras are part of the evolution of multimedia digital products that have positive applications for educators, students, and industry. Multimedia digital video can be utilized by any personal computer and it allows the user to control, combine, and manipulate different types of media, such as text, sound, video, computer graphics, and animation.

Because of their convenience and affordability, digital cameras have a wide range of use as an instructional tool. To name a few, it allows teachers to evaluate other teachers in the field through the use of digital cameras and provide relevant lessons to hearing impaired students. To explore this issue, the paper analyzes the responses from public school business teachers regarding their use of some educational hardwares in teaching. To accomplish that, a sample of 226 Public School business education and office administration teachers in North Carolina were surveyed to investigate their use of digital still cameras, editing software's and video digital cameras. The paper examines how satisfied teachers are with their current software skills, and their comfort level in using digital cameras. Furthermore, the paper explores the educators ethnic background, and analyzes their current skills, comfort levels and usage of instructional cameras, hardware and software in teaching.

Computer Applications in Business and Office Education

Numerous researchers, Redmann, (1996), Wallace (1997), Swope, (1998)) have documented thousands of computer applications for business education including internet computer applications. Computer Applications for Business and Office Education teachers include presentations, spreadsheets, rosters, posters, reports, and other written documents for accounting, marketing, finance, career exploration, distance education, records managment, and other courses. In a study of computer applications for business education, Ellis (1996) reported that electronic mail or e-mail was the backbone application of the internet and e-mail was responsible for the rapid growth of the internet because it provided an easy communication medium that was very user friendly. Ahnager and Little (1997) also indicated that the accessibility of the world wide web (www) and its flexibility for conveying digital information in various forms makes it a convenient mode of communication for education.

In a review of chat technology, Ellis (1998) reported that business and office education teachers used chat technology for conferences, distance learning courses, group projects, case studies, and games between people and/or computer opponents.

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