UNINVITED GUEST the Griffin Inn: East Sussex

Daily Mail (London), April 7, 2004 | Go to article overview

UNINVITED GUEST the Griffin Inn: East Sussex


Byline: MAX DAVIDSON

WHAT a perfect microcosm of all that is best in England! A 16th-century pub in an unspoiled village.

Applecheeked rustics propping up the bar. Fading prints of old cricket teams. Beamed ceilings. Panelled walls. The smell of warm beer and turkey pie and chips.

For 400 years, the Griffin Inn was 'just a pub', though a good one. In recent years, it has spread its wings and reinvented itself as a pubcumrestaurant with rooms.The result is perfect: retaining the best of the old, yet introducing some of the excitement of the new. If every village deserves its own post office, it also deserves its own Griffin.

There are only eight bedrooms, but they have been lovingly furnished. Mine was in the stable block and overlooked the beer-garden. It would probably have been noisy in the summer, but in spring, and at only [pounds sterling]70 for B&B, felt like the height of luxury.

There was a four-poster bed, a mountain of soft pillows, a beautiful antique writing-desk and a huge Victorian bath.

Well-chosen prints adorned the walls. It took about ten minutes to get ye olde key to fit into ye olde keyhole, but you cannot have everything.

Dinner, in the stylishly furnished restaurant, was equally delightful. The chef is a dab hand at salsas, delicate, densely flavoured condiments, and was at the top of his game. My seared scallops came with a salsa of black pudding and peppers, my pan-fried tuna with a salsa of tomato and crayfish. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

UNINVITED GUEST the Griffin Inn: East Sussex
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.