Praise from a Saint, Others

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 16, 2004 | Go to article overview

Praise from a Saint, Others


Byline: Ann Geracimos & Kevin Chaffee, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

"We're still doing it, and we still love it," an impassioned Eva Marie Saint said following the appearance on the Kennedy Center's Eisenhower stage Monday of four legendary actresses in a symposium billed "Women of Tennessee."

After the late playwright Tennessee Williams, that is, of whom Kennedy Center President Michael Kaiser said in introductory remarks, "Not since William Shakespeare has an English [language] playwright portrayed such seminal characters." The women - Miss Saint, Estelle Parsons, Rosemary Harris and Zoe Caldwell - were all associated at one time or another with Mr. Williams' greater and lesser-known characters in such works as "A Streetcar Named Desire," "The Glass Menagerie" and "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof."

The formidable quartet - who have two Oscars, five Tonys, 10 Tony nominations and one Emmy among them - are all happily married, living well and working often.

Miss Saint, 79, will appear next in a feature film titled "Because of Winn-Dixie." British-born Rosemary Harris, 73, will be seen next in "Spiderman II," opening June 30, and onstage in November in New York in Edward Albee's "The Lady From Dubuque."

Miss Parsons, 76, who is phasing out a managerial role running New York's famed Actors Studio, will be in two forthcoming HBO films, "Strip Search" and "Empire Falls," and has a part in a David Hare play, "The Bay at Nice" debuting on the Hartford Stage in Connecticut this fall.

Australian-born Zoe Caldwell, 70, has two productions this summer, "Limonade Tout Les Jours" (with Alan Alda) at the Bay Street Theatre in Sag Harbor, N.Y., and "A Little Night Music" at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles. "Then I go home and fall down," she said.

Charles Osgood, of CBS-TV fame, played host for the event, the prelude to "Tennessee Williams Explored," a four-month-long KenCen theater festival opening Wednesday. …

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