Mystery Death of Sherlock Scholar

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), April 24, 2004 | Go to article overview

Mystery Death of Sherlock Scholar


Byline: SAM LISTER

THE world's leadingauthority on Sherlock Holmes was found garrotted in a mystery worthy of the fictional detective,an inquest heard.

Richard Lancelyn Green,a biographer of the sleuth's creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, was discovered strangled with a shoelace tightened around his neck with a wooden spoon.

The 50-year-oldfreelance writer and scholar, who was bornin Bebington,Wirral,came to prominence for his fanatical devotion to the author.

In the days leading up to his death,Mr Green had grown increasingly concernedabout the imminent auction of Sir Arthur's books and letters at Christie's.

The Oxford graduate insisted they should go to the British Library where scholars could see the collection.

His sister,Priscilla West, told Westminster Coroner's Court:``I had a very, very strange conversation with him in which it was clear he was very concerned about the Sherlock Holmes upcoming auction.

``He was very, very angry indeed about it.

``He also made comments about his own reputation and the possibility of his name being in the papers.''

Mr Lancelyn Green's family home was Poulton Hall at Poulton Lancelyn.

He read English at Oxford University after attending Bradfield school in Berkshire and dedicated his life to researching and writing about Conan Doyle, eventually becoming chairman of the Sherlock Holmes Society of London.

Mr Lancelyn Green had become convinced there was a conspiracy against him,and believed an American rival intended to besmirch his name. …

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