Robots and Sensors Help Make Seniors Mobile: Assistive Technologies Improve Mobility and Independence

By Coles, Clifton | The Futurist, May-June 2004 | Go to article overview

Robots and Sensors Help Make Seniors Mobile: Assistive Technologies Improve Mobility and Independence


Coles, Clifton, The Futurist


A new generation of robotic assistance systems is restoring quality of life for the elderly. Designed for use at home as well as in hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, and nursing homes, these systems are helping older, less-agile people to keep moving on their own.

New robots and other technical aids emphasize human-machine cooperation using novel communication interfaces between the elderly and their environment, according to Rodolphe Gelin, head of the Robotics and Interactive Systems Department at France's Atomic Energy Authority.

One system, called Nemo+, uses stored infrared and other codes to remotely control telephones, televisions, lighting systems, and doors in the home. A small box attached to a wheelchair's armrest houses the electronics and software. Nemo+ can perform up to 200 functions and responds to commands in English, Italian, and Swedish.

Another system helps restore manipulation functions for elderly people suffering from serious impairment of the upper limbs. The robot, which can carry up to 4.5 pounds, has six degrees of freedom, and is fully computer controlled. The control interface is personalized and can be voice-controlled. The manipulator arm makes it possible to carry out everyday tasks such as picking up a book, pouring a drink, or using a microwave oven.

Between 6% and 8% of people older than 65 and living at home are incapable of standing up from a chair or a bed without assistance. The Automax unit, patented by Alter Eco Sante of France, is a swiveling grab bar that helps patients stand up on their own.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Intelligent walkers are also increasing mobility. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Robots and Sensors Help Make Seniors Mobile: Assistive Technologies Improve Mobility and Independence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.