Underground Trains across America?

The Futurist, May-June 2004 | Go to article overview

Underground Trains across America?


The solution to U.S. transportation problems may be an underground vacuum tube magnetic levitation system, according to transportation visionary Brad Swartzwelter. Called American-Metro, Swartzwelter's system would operate without fossil fuels, have almost no friction points, and serve the entire country at speeds faster than the fastest jets.

"Technology now exists to build a transportation system more advanced than anything most people can imagine," says Swartzwelter, an Amtrak conductor and railroad operating rules instructor. "Such a system could carry almost unlimited passengers and goods in complete safety from coast to coast in under three hours, achieving speeds of well over 900 miles per hour."

Swartzwelter's proposal would include a network of underground tunnels lying in perfectly straight lines from starting point to destination. Tunnels would be strong, waterproof, airtight, and long lasting. Within the tunnels would lie a maglev track that suspends vehicles on a nearly frictionless magnetic cushion. Massive air pumps would remove the majority of the atmosphere from the sealed tunnels, leaving vehicles in a partial vacuum. …

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