Peru: President Alejandro Toledo Dissolves Intelligence Service

NotiSur - South American Political and Economic Affairs, April 30, 2004 | Go to article overview

Peru: President Alejandro Toledo Dissolves Intelligence Service


Peruvian president Alejandro Toledo announced that he would be eliminating the Consejo Nacional de Inteligencia (CNI), or National Intelligence Council, after the resignation of the seventh director of the agency to hold the post during Toledo's tenure. The CNI was originally set up to replace the Servicio Nacional de Inteligencia (SIN), which lost credibility when proof of massive corruption within the SIN, run by former spymaster Vladimiro Montesinos, became public (see NotiSur, 2000-10-06). Peruvian officials said too many agents with ties to Montesinos remained in the scandal-plagued agency to allow it continue running.

Repeated resignations lead to dissolution

In late March, Vice-Admiral Ricardo Arbocco became the seventh man to head the agency since Toledo's inauguration in June 2001, but had to step down two days into his term after it emerged that he was being investigated for corruption. Arbocco's immediate predecessor at the CNI, Daniel Mora, resigned after it was discovered that some of his subordinates were plotting against Interior Minister Fernando Rospigliosi. Rospigliosi is responsible for internal security and a plot to have him removed from office led to Mora's resignation, but a national secretary from Toledo's Peru Posible (PP) party later said the plot was not against Rospigliosi but rather against Mora, the CNI director. Hugo Garavito, PP Secretary for Ideology, said the intent of the plot was "to destabilize the presidency of the CNI."

Rospigliosi expressed concerns about documents that had disappeared from the CNI's offices shortly after it was shut down.

After the double round of resignations, Prime Minister Carlos Ferrero said too many agents had ties to the exiled former president Alberto Fujimori and his security advisor Montesinos. Montesinos has been jailed for abuse of power and is awaiting trial on dozens of other charges, including money laundering and drug and arms trafficking. Fujimori, living in Japan, is wanted by Peru for allegedly organizing death squads.

Analysts said Toledo's appointment of Arbocco would reinforce the public's lack of confidence in the president's government. Currently, Toledo has single-digit approval ratings (see NotiSur, 2004-02-13).

Temporary administrator appointed

The Peruvian government appointed Admiral Julio Aybel Raygada as temporary administrator for the CNI on March 26. The official newspaper "El Peruano" printed a decree which said Raygada "will be in charge of a temporary administration that will assume the assigned duties of the CNI until it concludes the process of reorganization with in 90 days.

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