Psychology in the Schools, School Psychology Review, School Psychology Quarterly, and Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation Editors Collaborate to Chart School Psychology's Past, Present, and "Futures"

By D'Amato, Rik Carl; Sheridan, Susan M. et al. | School Psychology Review, Winter 2004 | Go to article overview

Psychology in the Schools, School Psychology Review, School Psychology Quarterly, and Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation Editors Collaborate to Chart School Psychology's Past, Present, and "Futures"


D'Amato, Rik Carl, Sheridan, Susan M., Phelps, LeAdelle, Lopez, Emilia C., School Psychology Review


For the first time in the history of school psychology, four editors of journals with a school psychology readership are collaborating to offer our field extensive coverage of the recently held School Psychology Futures conference and to continue discussion on a variety of topics relevant to the professional practice of school psychology. This introduction will briefly describe the special journal issues that will be offered in Psychology in the Schools (PITS), School Psychology Review (SPR), School Psychology Quarterly (SPQ), and Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation (JEPC) on topics related to the conference. This information is provided in an effort to offer our readers a Futures link across a variety of journals and organizations (including both the Division of School Psychology of the American Psychological Association and the National Association of School Psychologists). (All of our journals are available by subscription, or individual special issues can be purchased from the publishers listed.) This introduction, which will be reprinted at the beginning of all of our special issues, will establish a context for the Futures conference by discussing the promise (and practice) of school psychology in our ever changing, vibrant, but problem-saturated society. We hope you will join us in using these vital resources to help chart new Futures for school psychology.

For almost a half-century, students in school psychology have investigated the "Boulder" and "Thayer" conferences (e.g., Cutts, 1955; Raimy, 1950), studying and exploring our foundation as scientist-practitioners and brooding over the "school" in school psychology. While the Boulder conference clearly contributed to the science in our practice (Bardon, 1989; Gutkin & Reynolds, 1999), most of the issues considered at the Thayer conference (e.g., titles, roles, and services) were not resolved. The contributions of the "other" conferences, the Olympia Conference and the Spring Hill Symposium, remain even less obvious and the outcomes are even more debated (Ysseldyke & Weinberg, 1981). Indeed, school psychology's track record with psychology conferences is filled with a great deal of conversation but little documented change (Conoley & Gutkin, 1995; D'Amato & Dean, 1989; Sheridan & Gutkin, 2000). Nevertheless, current conceptualizations of leadership stress strategic planning and popular maxims of our day still reflect Benjamin Franklin's belief that "By failing to prepare you are preparing to fail."

With this in mind, NASP and APA proactively cooperated with other child advocacy groups (e.g., Society for the Study of School Psychology) to offer the November, 2002 conference in Indianapolis, Indiana with the goal of examining contemporary needs, issues and practices, and preparing for our "Futures." Through the use of technology, the Futures e-conference was able to connect to various sites and individuals from around the world. While typical on site meetings were held, as had previously been the case, in vivo broadcasts connected Indianapolis with school psychology practitioners, university trainers, and students-in-training across the globe. Individuals at these remote sites were able to attend and participate in the conference, including asking questions from presenters in real time.

School Psychology Review/School Psychology Quarterly (1)

In a notable alliance, SPR and SPQ are publishing the proceedings of the conference jointly. The conference proceedings will be in the 2003 Winter issue of SPQ and in the 2004 Spring issue of SPR. This partnership is providing all members of the largest two professional school psychology associations a copy of the conference proceedings. In an effort to provide individuals who are members of both organizations with original information, SPR will publish its traditional research articles with the conference proceedings in the second half of their Spring 2004 issue. …

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Psychology in the Schools, School Psychology Review, School Psychology Quarterly, and Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation Editors Collaborate to Chart School Psychology's Past, Present, and "Futures"
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